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View Full Version : Georgia Rep Paul Broun Introduces “Audit the Fed” Legislation



KC
01-09-2013, 01:51 PM
I'm glad to see someone is carrying the torch after Rep. Ron Paul has retired. Coincidentally, the latest audit the fed bill was introduced by another politicians with the name Paul:

http://ivn.us/2013/01/06/georgia-rep-paul-broun-introduces-audit-the-fed-legislation/


In one of his first acts in the new Congress, Georgia US Rep Paul Broun, a congressman in his fourth term, introduced (http://www.politico.com/blogs/on-congress/2013/01/broun-wants-to-audit-the-fed-153390.html?hp=r14) legislation to audit the Federal Reserve, HR 24. The text in Broun’s legislation is identical to Paul’s HR 459, which passed the House 327-98, but died in the Senate. A partial audit of the Federal Reserve in 2011 discovered (http://theeconomiccollapseblog.com/archives/have-you-heard-about-the-16-trillion-dollar-bailout-the-federal-reserve-handed-to-the-too-big-to-fail-banks) that $16 trillion was distributed to corporations and foreign central banks during the financial crisis without any oversight from Congress or acknowledgement to the taxpayers.

GrassrootsConservative
01-09-2013, 01:55 PM
Good. I'm sure this guy will do fine, but I'll miss Ron Paul.
Rand is sure to go far.

KC
01-09-2013, 01:59 PM
Good. I'm sure this guy will do fine, but I'll miss Ron Paul.
Rand is sure to go far.

Rand should go far, I've got my hopes up since the guy seems to be more of a politician, less an idealist.

Broun apparently isn't the only one carrying the torch. This article also mentions Broun and a few other dissidents within the Republican party:

http://www.thenewamerican.com/usnews/congress/item/14130-ron-pauls-liberty-movement-spreads-in-congress


The influence of Dr. Paul could also be seen in the vote on House Speaker January 3 (http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2013/roll002.xml). Although Dr. Paul didn't vote against John Boehner as speaker two years ago (http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2011/roll002.xml), he was so frequently a lone vote of dissent against his own party he obtained the nickname “Dr. No” in the House. On January 3, some 13 Republican congressmen declined to vote for Boehner (http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2013/roll002.xml), many of whom got their start with the Ron Paul movement or were endorsed by Paul in the most recent election.


Those 13 Republicans who voted against Boehner as speaker included veteran Representative Walter Jones (“Freedom Index” 97 percent), who was probably more influenced by Ron Paul than any other member of Congress, as well as freshmen Ted Yoho of Florida, Thomas Massie of Kentucky, and Steve Stockman of Texas. Yoho, Massie, and Stockman received an endorsement from Paul and a contribution from Paul's PAC in the past election.

Deadwood
01-09-2013, 02:10 PM
A partial audit of the Federal Reserve in 2011 discovered (http://theeconomiccollapseblog.com/archives/have-you-heard-about-the-16-trillion-dollar-bailout-the-federal-reserve-handed-to-the-too-big-to-fail-banks) that $16 trillion was distributed to corporations and foreign central banks during the financial crisis without any oversight from Congress or acknowledgement to the taxpayers.


There is the operative phrase> $16 trillion with no oversight; that means it lined pockets.

Now consider this: Barack Obama promised the United States the most "most open and transparent" government in the history of the United States. And one of his first acts was to throw at least $16 trillion away with "no accountability"

And now his senseless Senate sycophants will block it again.

But, as we all know it's the teabagger's fault

zelmo1234
01-09-2013, 02:22 PM
I hope he can get enough Democrats to agree?

Alif Qadr
01-09-2013, 02:30 PM
I'm glad to see someone is carrying the torch after Rep. Ron Paul has retired. Coincidentally, the latest audit the fed bill was introduced by another politicians with the name Paul:

http://ivn.us/2013/01/06/georgia-rep-paul-broun-introduces-audit-the-fed-legislation/

Sanctity of Life Act would have been a great law if only more in Congress would have the fortitude to stand on principles and causes other than Israel.

On the topic of Israel, I wish Chuck(wagon) Hagel the best in his confirmation hearings but again I digress from the OP. SOZ.

As I thought about what I just posted it dawned on me the politics does not have to be so corrupt and disgusting. One of the reasons that ti remains so is that people, including myself, have resigned ourselves to the fact that it is corrupt so we tacitly approve of the underhanded dealings. I am tired of playing part and parcel to "politics as usual". TO tell the truth, because of what I have just realized, I am more angry with myself than anything. It is time to clean house and I mean clean house. Sure it is going to be uncomfortable by taking us out of our safety zones but all things worthwhile are brought about through discomfort. It we really want an accountable representative government that is responsive to only us, than we are going to have to fight for it. If we want a better way of life, than we are going to have to fight for it. Fighting takes two forms, mentally and physically. Hopefully the latter will not be necessary.

Alif Qadr
01-09-2013, 02:35 PM
There is the operative phrase> $16 trillion with no oversight; that means it lined pockets.

Now consider this: Barack Obama promised the United States the most "most open and transparent" government in the history of the United States. And one of his first acts was to throw at least $16 trillion away with "no accountability"

And now his senseless Senate sycophants will block it again.

But, as we all know it's the teabagger's fault


There is the operative phrase> $16 trillion with no oversight; that means it lined pockets.
BINGO! Nothing says politics like a nice greased palm.

KC
01-09-2013, 02:35 PM
Sanctity of Life Act would have been a great law if only more in Congress would have the fortitude to stand on principles and causes other than Israel.

On the topic of Israel, I wish Chuck(wagon) Hagel the best in his confirmation hearings but again I digress from the OP. SOZ.

I disagree with the Sanctity of life act on the grounds that I think that if we are to allow the Federal government to define life, it ought to be done via a Constitutional Amendment, not just legislation passed by a simple majority.

I didn't agree with everything Ron Paul stood for, but the man was undoubtedly one of the few great men willing to stand up for principles, even the ones that don't make you popular with lobbyists or partisans.