PDA

View Full Version : Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) - Would you...



Adelaide
02-01-2013, 11:00 PM
Six high school football players' brains were among the 68 brains exhibiting chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) examined in a new, biggest-of-its kind study that has historically established four progressive stages of the degenerative brain disease CTE.

The new study, published in the journal Brain, "extends our knowledge concerning the spectrum of the clinical and pathological abnormalities associated with CTE," says Ann McKee, lead author of the study and a School of Medicine professor and a co-director of the Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy (CSTE).

CTE is believed to be caused by repeated brain trauma and has been seen in military veterans, professional athletes, and in people who may hurt themselves with repetitive head-banging, according to the authors.

Repeated Head Trauma From Contact Sports Linked to Brain Disease (http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/253516.php)

So, my question is... based on all of the information coming out about brain injuries related to contact sports, would you allow your child (real or imagined) to play contact sports?

Captain Obvious
02-01-2013, 11:06 PM
Yes.

All of this coverage, while some of it's real, is just 'flavor-of-the-day' stuff.

Stress kills also, and if one of my kids had the option of being a, say a lawyer and risking an early death due to stress or becoming a pro athlete and risking a serious injury - I'll say go for being an athlete. Pay and lifestyle is better and all things considered the risk is small. In my opinion of course.

Baseball.

Peter1469
02-01-2013, 11:07 PM
I voted depends: a boy, yes. A girl, no.

An interesting tidbit; the US Army and the NFL teamed up to develop better helmets. But the cold facts are you cannot prevent concussions - the brain still moves around inside the head....

Adelaide
02-01-2013, 11:23 PM
I voted depends: a boy, yes. A girl, no.

An interesting tidbit; the US Army and the NFL teamed up to develop better helmets. But the cold facts are you cannot prevent concussions - the brain still moves around inside the head....

I'm sure I know why... but why not for females? Even if it is with other females?

I played contact sports with the guys - I didn't think it was that weird!

Peter1469
02-01-2013, 11:30 PM
I'm sure I know why... but why not for females? Even if it is with other females?

I played contact sports with the guys - I didn't think it was that weird!

I don't think it is weird. I think the chances of injury are much greater. I don't know about Canada, but in the US the rate of knee injuries in soccer and basketball are much higher for girls than boys.

Adelaide
02-01-2013, 11:37 PM
I don't think it is weird. I think the chances of injury are much greater. I don't know about Canada, but in the US the rate of knee injuries in soccer and basketball are much higher for girls than boys.

So what sports do you think females should refrain from participating in?

KC
02-01-2013, 11:55 PM
It was tough for me to decide whether to say yes or depends. Life is too short to spend it worrying about what could happen, so if my hypothetical child really wanted to be involved in some contact sport, I wouldn't just allow but encourage. I would refrain from doing so if I didn't think they really wanted to.

Peter1469
02-02-2013, 12:36 AM
So what sports do you think females should refrain from participating in?

I don't think that I am qualified to tell any female, that is not my daughter, about their choices with sports. If I had one, I would try to get her interested in martial arts. At least then she would be able to protect herself when I wasn't there. I would not want her playing soccer or basketball for the reasons I mentioned above. But if she insisted I would likely fold like a cheap chair. :smiley:

What did you expect me to say?

Adelaide
02-02-2013, 01:26 AM
I don't think that I am qualified to tell any female, that is not my daughter, about their choices with sports. If I had one, I would try to get her interested in martial arts. At least then she would be able to protect herself when I wasn't there. I would not want her playing soccer or basketball for the reasons I mentioned above. But if she insisted I would likely fold like a cheap chair. :smiley:

What did you expect me to say?

I didn't expect anything - merely curious. :)

Adelaide
02-02-2013, 12:02 PM
It was tough for me to decide whether to say yes or depends. Life is too short to spend it worrying about what could happen, so if my hypothetical child really wanted to be involved in some contact sport, I wouldn't just allow but encourage. I would refrain from doing so if I didn't think they really wanted to.

That makes sense, and I suppose that would be my attitude about it, as well.

Chris
02-02-2013, 12:06 PM
I wasn't much for contact sports beyond sandlot and a little highschool wrestling. My son's the same, karate enough for a kid's BB.

There's a lot of this in the news lately from pro football players that says to me you need the right gear.

oceanloverOH
02-02-2013, 01:25 PM
My answer is that I have to say it depends. I was in a girls' team sports program in high school....played field hockey, basketball, volleyball and softball. Sports are a very rewarding program for children, building character and morale and a great teaching tool for camaraderie and teamwork. I don't have a problem with most sports, as long as the school system budget allows for the best equipment available. It is mandatory that the children are equipped with proper padding, shin guards, face masks, helmets, etc. needed for some of these sports. If my child's high school was not able to afford the proper equipment, and parents were not able to raise the amount necessary to completely outfit each child in appropriate gear.....then no way.

Adelaide
02-02-2013, 01:35 PM
I wasn't much for contact sports beyond sandlot and a little highschool wrestling. My son's the same, karate enough for a kid's BB.

There's a lot of this in the news lately from pro football players that says to me you need the right gear.

Yeah, having proper equipment would be key to preventing as much damage or risk of injury as possible, but even the best equipment can't prevent things like concussions (as I believe Peter pointed out).

I would say this is a "fashionable" issue... I think lately they have had the chance to autopsy and study the brains of athletes who competed in contact sports, and they're realising that this condition (CTE) is surprisingly common amongst that group.

Also, something that should be said is that coaches and sports leagues (for kids) must remove them from the game if they take a hit to the head, regardless of whether there are symptoms. They should have to see a doctor before being allowed back on the field. Parents also need to learn to respect that. There have been a couple cases here locally where kids were put back in the game and then died or were otherwise handicapped for life due to untreated head injuries.