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momsapplepie
10-14-2014, 03:54 PM
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/vampire-grave-bulgaria-holds-skeleton-stake-through-its-heart-180953004/?no-ist

yeah, the real thing discovered in Bulgaria. Question would be was it really a vampire?

Animal Mother
10-14-2014, 03:55 PM
Must be a vampire. Can't be anything else, can it Codename Section Alyosha Peter1469 ?

:rollseyes:

Mister D
10-14-2014, 03:55 PM
I don't believe in vampires but the old folktales are awesome.

momsapplepie
10-14-2014, 04:00 PM
Ever heard of Elizabeth Bathory? If there ever was a vampire, that would have been her. Not that she drank blood, but she definitely used human blood.

Peter1469
10-14-2014, 04:00 PM
Lots of people in Eastern Europe were buried that way.

Peter1469
10-14-2014, 04:03 PM
Ever heard of Elizabeth Bathory? If there ever was a vampire, that would have been her. Not that she drank blood, but she definitely used human blood.

She was certainly odd. (http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/ptop/plain/A593084)


Elizabeth Bathory, the Blood Countess, is one of the most famous of all historical vampires (http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/plain/A273566). She is perhaps less well-known only than the infamous Vlad Dracula, known also as Tepes (the Impaler) and he - although noted for his savage and very public methods of execution - was no vampire, but has merely been cited as the inspiration for Bram Stoker (http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/plain/A588233)'s fictional Count Dracula. In fact, the historical Dracula is usually best known as a devout, if savage, Christian warrior and noted for his successful enforcement of the law within the Voevodate of Wallachia. Elizabeth Bathory on the other hand is renowned as a torturer, an eater of flesh and a bather in blood, and has been cited by prominent vampirologist Raymond McNally in his book Dracula was a Woman (which is currently out of print) as a closer model for Bram Stoker's creation than Tepes.


Bathory, like Stoker's Dracula, was a Hungarian1 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/ptop/plain/A593084#footnote1) of noble blood, whereas Tepes was Romanian; the Voevod, or Prince, of Wallachia when said title was not in the hands of his brother. Also, although his deeds were bloody, Tepes is never reported to have drunk the blood of his victims, while Elizabeth Bathory is reputed (admittedly with only anecdotal evidence) to have not only drunk but bathed in the blood of young virgin girls. The truth of whether she was a model for the Count will remain known only to Stoker, but certainly in the years since Dracula was published, the Blood Countess has exercised a powerful fascination on many writers and film-makers.

Mister D
10-14-2014, 04:04 PM
Lots of people in Eastern Europe were buried that way.

You seem similar things in Italy and other parts of western Europe. Surprisingly, it was actually more common (as were witch hunts etc.) after the medieval era. :wink:

momsapplepie
10-14-2014, 04:12 PM
yes many buried that way, along with being beheaded, weighed down by rocks, legs broken off, large rocks jammed in the mouths, stakes, silver crosses, garlic necklaces, etc.

sachem
10-14-2014, 04:37 PM
I like stories like this.

Codename Section
10-14-2014, 06:29 PM
Must be a vampire. Can't be anything else, can it @Codename Section (http://thepoliticalforums.com/member.php?u=866) @Alyosha (http://thepoliticalforums.com/member.php?u=863) @Peter1469 (http://thepoliticalforums.com/member.php?u=10) ?

:rollseyes:


Probably a vampire.