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View Full Version : Who likes the "universe" type shows?



Trinnity
08-12-2012, 01:32 AM
OMG, I eat that stuff up.
The Universe
How the universe works
Wonders of the Solar System
Wonders of the Universe
Through the Wormhole
Nova (quantum theory, Boson Higgs, etc)

This is the science-nerd of my personality.... let's discuss the universe, the cosmic web, multiverses, all of it. <panting>

Trinnity
08-12-2012, 01:38 AM
http://www.outerspaceuniverse.org/media/binary-star-system.jpg

https://encrypted-tbn1.google.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSIQngz5SQKNGWZhpzHnXkJ5jLgpiuKf Rv2PmWlil7cEDUtEa0p

http://www.nightskynation.com/pics/pulsars.jpg

Trinnity
08-12-2012, 01:50 AM
http://gifsoup.com/webroot/animatedgifs3/2249412_o.gif

CG graphics ---> Binary star system collision resulting in dual supernovae to a black hole.

Trinnity
08-12-2012, 01:56 AM
The black hole at the center of our galaxy is fourteen million miles wide. Can you wrap your mind around a density of that magnitude? If so, then imagine the singularity.

http://heasarc.nasa.gov/docs/xte/learning_center/images_movies/bulge3.gif

This ^ is a gif of the center of our galaxy. It's in infrared. Our space telescope that makes this possible is the Spitzer. more info (http://www.nasa.gov/centers/jpl/missions/spitzer.html)
The orbs you see are stars.


Far beyond Earth, near the center of our Galaxy, is a different kind of light show. RXTE captured images of a couple dozen stars blinking on and off like our earth-bound fireflies, as they give off random flares of X-rays and then disappear. Some of these flares last only a few minutes, and other last for months.

Twice weekly, since February 1999, Dr. Craig Markwardt and other researchers of the Goddard Space Flight Center have been scanning the galactic center region with RXTE, looking for an elusive type of pulsar.
The first and only such pulsar, designated SAX J1808.4-3658 (http://heasarc.nasa.gov/docs/xte/learning_center/discover_0798.html), was discovered in April of 1998, providing evidence for the theory that suggests a missing evolutionary link between old isolated millisecond pulsars and slower-spinning pulsars in binary (two-star) systems.

http://heasarc.nasa.gov/docs/xte/learning_center/discover_0699.html

There's only one thing that interests me more than politics - cosmological science. God forgive me, I'm a groupie. I don't have the math in my background that gives me the right to call myself an expert on this topic. But it enthralls me.






And no matter how hard I try, I can't get rid of that box up there.
<grrrrrr>

Trinnity
08-12-2012, 02:23 AM
Thanks to adaptive optics (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adaptive_optics), we can see a real picture of the center of our galaxy. This is what it really looks like.

http://www.cosmosportal.org/files/36201_36300/36204/file_36204.jpg

The arrows point to the area of the black hole. It's relatively small. It's not possible as far as I know from what I've learned, that planets are even a possibility in gravitational fields as strong are those that exist there.
Consider this:
The stars shown that are "big" are hugely larger than OUR star. WOW

Trinnity
08-12-2012, 02:42 AM
Look at this youtube of the rotation of stars around the black hole at the center of our galaxy.
(black holes was the topic of my senior year of high school physics project/thesis in 1977)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fE_uPcRV5hE

The star that rotates most rapidly around the black hole is called S1.

roadmaster
08-12-2012, 02:59 AM
It's amazing what's out there. I was a more of a History buff but one of my cousins would watch the night with his telescope and we would all sit around and talk.

Trinnity
08-12-2012, 03:25 AM
There's so much we don't know and so much we're learning fast.
But the overriding factor in my mind is the barrier of distance. We're isolated, yet safe from predators from elsewhere because of that distance.

If you can imagine it, it might be so.

http://media.comicvine.com/uploads/6/63458/2007221-borg_cube.jpg

IMO, the voyager message giving coordinates to our home planet was ill advised. Just sayin'. And btw, do we NEED to be in touch with other civilizations on foreign planets? That's risky.

Carygrant
08-12-2012, 03:41 AM
I have shared the same interests from teenage years . And thank goodness there are so many brilliant books that avoid the necessity of having special degrees in maths but still allow meaningful descriptions and explanations of the most complex matters .
I am a teeny bit besotted with the works of Paul La Violette and in the context of the galaxy centre and it's inevitable consequences , I recommend him in the strongest possible terms .
You Tube shows at least two long interviews with him where he outlines Super Wave theory and Project Camelot . His work on anti gravity is momentous .
His works are frowned on , probably because he cuts across so many areas of secret US development --- the various so called Black technology subjects . Others believe he is a colossus who has updated Einstein's work fundamentally --- never likely to go down well with the"system".

Peter1469
08-12-2012, 08:13 AM
Great stuff!

AZFlyFisher
09-11-2012, 04:43 PM
I'm a junkie for those shows, too, along with shows like Planet Earth. That's about the only thing I watch nowadays. We recently purchased a 55" HD TV and have a great surround sound system. It's great watching those shows on the big, clear screen.

With Netflix and Cox Cable I have access to entire seasons worth of many of these shows.

GrassrootsConservative
09-18-2012, 01:40 AM
http://www.cracked.com/article_19479_the-6-most-mind-blowing-things-ever-discovered-in-space.html

529

Trinnity
09-18-2012, 05:50 AM
Is that the "cat's eye" nebula? ^

Cedric
09-18-2012, 06:00 AM
The other day the wife and I were speculating on the God particle [Higgs boson], which physicists insist could be the key to developing an underlying theory of everything necessary to explain the universe. Gasp! Liberals look away. Yes conservatives do sometimes talk about such things!

Anyway it occurred to us that any eventual proof that the Higgs boson does exist still will not serve as the basis for an underlying theory of how the universe is put together and works if String Theory ever becomes more than just a fascinating theory . . . because String Theory pretty much insists that "Yes Mr. Einstein, God really does play dice with the universe; once you get to a certain level of really deep sub atomic physics." Meh, then she changed out the laundry and I did the dishes.

Cedric
09-18-2012, 06:07 AM
Look at this youtube of the rotation of stars around the black hole at the center of our galaxy.
(black holes was the topic of my senior year of high school physics project/thesis in 1977)

Yes, I particularly like this one since I am a sucker for changeable perspective live diagramming, and not just because it's pretty but because it is information loaded. Very nice. Thanks! Astronomy and cosmology has always been a hobby of mine though mostly just between the pages of books.

Cedric
09-18-2012, 06:10 AM
There's so much we don't know and so much we're learning fast.
But the overriding factor in my mind is the barrier of distance. We're isolated, yet safe from predators from elsewhere because of that distance.

If you can imagine it, it might be so.

http://media.comicvine.com/uploads/6/63458/2007221-borg_cube.jpg

IMO, the voyager message giving coordinates to our home planet was ill advised. Just sayin'. And btw, do we NEED to be in touch with other civilizations on foreign planets? That's risky.

Actually it's going to be okay Trinnity since even as we exchange thoughts on this science is working on a real warp drive. Here's the LINK: http://news.yahoo.com/warp-drive-may-more-feasible-thought-scientists-161301109.html

Trinnity
09-18-2012, 07:10 AM
Yes, I particularly like this one since I am a sucker for changeable perspective live diagramming, and not just because it's pretty but because it is information loaded. Very nice. Thanks! Astronomy and cosmology has always been a hobby of mine though mostly just between the pages of books.Oooh, I like you.

Trinnity
09-18-2012, 07:11 AM
Do you thing warp drive is really possible?

Cedric
09-18-2012, 07:41 AM
Do you thing warp drive is really possible?

I have absolutely no idea, but it's obvious that our scientists are now thinking of it as a mere engineering problem rather than something that actually breaks any known rules of physics. So I'm going to defer to their judgment calls on this issue.

GrassrootsConservative
09-18-2012, 09:52 AM
Is that the "cat's eye" nebula? ^

Nope, that's the Helix Nebula, AKA eye of God.


Do you thing warp drive is really possible?

Yep, using black holes and worm holes, both time travel and warp drive become possible as soon as we can come up with a vessel that can withstand the matter inside these things that would destroy the ships we currently use. We're not talking about anytime soon though. You and I will never see such technologies in our lifetimes. Probably not even our great-great-great-great-great grandchildren will see such technologies. We're talking about material stronger than any metal we know today, many HUGE scientific advancements will need to take place before we can even attempt any of this.

Trinnity
09-18-2012, 10:30 AM
Aren't wormholes supposed to be unstable? Or is that just speculation.
As for using black holes, I don't see how that's possible due to the destructive nature of the gravitational forces.

GrassrootsConservative
09-18-2012, 10:57 AM
Aren't wormholes supposed to be unstable? Or is that just speculation.
As for using black holes, I don't see how that's possible due to the destructive nature of the gravitational forces.

Lol. I'm not going to go too far into it, but if you're truly curious, I'd Michio Kaku's "Visions" book that talks briefly about warp drive and time travel via black holes and worm holes. The whole book is good, it's about the future of science through the eyes of an actual scientist. I've educated myself so much on Quantum Theory and Astrophysics, you should too, it's really interesting to learn about.

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/visions-michio-kaku/1100572893

^They have a previously unused version of this book there for $4.34. I'd HIGHLY recommend reading up on Michio Kaku and Stephen Hawking.

Trinnity
09-18-2012, 11:00 AM
I think I'll ask for that for Christmas.

Carygrant
09-18-2012, 12:46 PM
Do you thing warp drive is really possible?


Judging by the Extremist Republicans here , that force is already with us .

GrassrootsConservative
09-18-2012, 04:53 PM
Judging by the Extremist Republicans here , that force is already with us .

What's wrong with you? Can't you keep your political shit in the political sections?
Nevermind, I guess "The Science Room" is beyond your level of reading comprehension.

Carygrant
09-18-2012, 06:30 PM
If you think warp drive is scientific , you will be amazed at my development work with the Twerp Detector for Alpha Wave Drive

GrassrootsConservative
09-18-2012, 08:40 PM
If you think warp drive is scientific , you will be amazed at my development work with the Twerp Detector for Alpha Wave Drive

Location: england

You don't say? :pointlaugh:

Trinnity
09-18-2012, 08:55 PM
CG, this is a nice thread. Stop mucking it up with your stupid comments. Thanks.

GrassrootsConservative
09-18-2012, 09:06 PM
CG, this is a nice thread. Stop mucking it up with your stupid comments. Thanks.

Hey at least that last insult he made he tried to put it into something that at least sounded scientific. Just point and laugh and let's try to get this threadtrain back onto the rails.

http://www.cracked.com/article_19649_6-myths-everyone-believes-about-space-thanks-to-movies.html
^ Blew my mind first time I read it. Now I look back and wonder how I could believe that shit. It's funny how learning something that contradicts something you've always thought just sometimes ends up reminding you how stupid you were before the correct information replaced the bullshit.

Trinnity
09-19-2012, 07:29 AM
The space shuttle Endeavor just took off for it's final flight - on top of the shuttle carry plane - to Houston. The trip will take 3 days, as they're making stops along the way to show her off. It's sad our space program has been so greatly curtailed. This is one of the "extra" things govt can do that really matters.


http://carolynsmithrealtor.files.wordpress.com/2012/09/endeavour-on-plane.jpg

Chris
09-19-2012, 09:04 AM
Yes, fascinating stuff, the universe and what we do and do not know about it.

Here's a guy, with a odd sense of humor and funny laugh, Seth Llyod, a mechanical engineering at MIT on the computational power of atoms, electrons, and elementary particles....


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I47TcQmYyo4

Chris
09-19-2012, 04:24 PM
These people have a great podcast: http://www.astronomycast.com/. It's not real, what, exciting, but they explain everything in everyday language.

AZFlyFisher
09-26-2012, 11:23 PM
This is a great site for up to date science news:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/

Trinnity
09-27-2012, 12:06 AM
This is COOL.

Asteroid's Troughs Suggest Stunted Planet ScienceDaily (Sep. 26, 2012) — Enormous troughs that reach across the asteroid Vesta may actually be stretch marks that hint of a complexity beyond most asteroids. Scientists have been trying to determine the origin of these unusual troughs since their discovery just last year. Now, a new analysis supports the notion that the troughs are faults that formed when a fellow asteroid smacked into Vesta's south pole. The research reinforces the claim that Vesta has a layered interior, a quality normally reserved for larger bodies, such as planets and large moons.


http://images.sciencedaily.com/2012/09/120926143519.jpg?1348684585


An image taken by NASA's Dawn spacecraft on July 24, 2011, shows troughs along the equator of the asteroid Vesta, including Divalia Fossa, which is larger than the Grand Canyon. A new study analyzing these troughs finds that they are probably graben – a dip in the surface with faults on either side that would indicate that Vesta has characteristics much like a planet or large moon.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120926143519.htm



Look at the pic ^
That's really interesting.