6 thoughts on “Hello world!

    1. kc Post author

      I agree Peter, and I can’t see why a God would want to create beings with the capacity to make moral decisions but would then stop them from doing so.

      Reply
  1. impress polly

    Sorry it’s taken me so long to reply! I’ve seen the post’s line of argument in defense of god around for a decade now and I’m sure it’s much older than that. Therein you define morality as choice; a definition that would likely be disputed by the founders of any of the world religions. Let’s take it as a given though that morality and choice are synonymous as your post presumes. The next question then is ‘what about god’s choice then?’ The quoted philosopher’s presumption is that power comes with responsibility. If you have the ability to prevent evil, then you have a moral obligation to do so. The alternative you propose is that the two things can be separated; that power can and perhaps even should exist without responsibility. Now think about that logic for a minute. Is that not immoral reasoning right there? If you walk down the street and see someone in the act of attacking an innocent person and opt do nothing about it — not to intervene or contact the police or what have you, but to simply go about your merry way instead — does that not implicate you by proxy? Legally it does, which implies that our society believes that it does. How much more so then with god, who is able to control ALL events in theory? Or are god’s ways simply so mysterious that we can’t relate to them? And if the latter is the case then why bother trying to understand and adhere to god’s ways? In other words, why bother being religious?

    Reply
    1. kc Post author

      Thoughtful response Polly, I appreciate it.

      First, I don’t think morality and choice are synonymous. Rather, choice is a necessary condition for morality.

      Essentially, if there is an omnipotent God (and as an Atheist I don’t take the exist of God for granted) there are two options, or choices. Allow evil to exist, and by doing so allow morality to exist, or prevent all evil, therefore creating a world without any morality.

      You said: “If you have the ability to prevent evil, then you have a moral obligation to do so.” Is this always the case? What if an evil can only be prevented by doing evil? Would it be evil to prevent men/women from making moral choices? The answer to this question may be entirely subjective.

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