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Thread: Could we Run Out of Fresh water in 12 years???

  1. #11
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    Captdon's Avatar Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ethereal View Post
    Does your whole world revolve around shitting on JAP's threads? It sure seems like it.
    Kiss off. I don't answer to you. I post to everyone's threads that interest me. That includes yours.

    I don't agree with you and I say so. I don't agree with him and I say so. I say so to a lot of people. You two aren't special nor have any special interest to me. You don't see me whining when people disagree with me. That's called maturity.

    Why don't you go back down in the Hole and bad mouth me?


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    Last edited by Captdon; 10-06-2018 at 12:49 PM.
    Liberals are a clear and present danger to our freedom and our society and our morals.

  2. #12
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    Just AnotherPerson's Avatar Senior Member
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    Here are a few links for anyone who is interested on lakes that may be drying up, or have already dried up. It is just for information purposes.

    10 lakes that are disappearing or are already gone
    http://mentalfloss.com/article/56732...r-already-gone


    Five of the worlds lakes at risk of drying up completely
    https://www.accuweather.com/en/weath...ng-up/30646819

    Are the great Lakes drying up?
    http://www.wbur.org/hereandnow/2013/...akes-declining
    We are all brothers and sisters in humanity. We are all made from the same dust of stars. We cannot be separated because all life is interconnected.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Just AnotherPerson View Post
    Here are a few links for anyone who is interested on lakes that may be drying up, or have already dried up. It is just for information purposes.

    10 lakes that are disappearing or are already gone
    http://mentalfloss.com/article/56732...r-already-gone


    Five of the worlds lakes at risk of drying up completely
    https://www.accuweather.com/en/weath...ng-up/30646819

    Are the great Lakes drying up?
    http://www.wbur.org/hereandnow/2013/...akes-declining
    The Great Lakes aren't drying up but you'd be spot on about the huge aquifer out West. We have wasted it for a hundred years. I don't agree with you much bit you're onto something here. We can solve the problem but we do have to stop making it worse it first.
    Liberals are a clear and present danger to our freedom and our society and our morals.

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    Peter1469 (10-06-2018)

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    Does everyone get a seat @ the table?

    Yep, a lot of related issues: Too much fertilizer used on crops, the excess runs off into the water system - either the water table or into rivers, & eventually to the oceans - where it creates dead zones. Fertilizers in the US are typically made from natural gas, so if the price of natural gas rises sufficiently, there will be natural incentives to apply just enough fertilizer. We need to find ways to get drug residues & other biological/chemical contaminants out of water we take into water treatment plants, clean up, & then return to the water table or rivers.

    Further down the line - we need to find alternatives to feeding crops to cattle, pigs, etc. for meat animals. It may mean eating further down the food chain - textured soy or something similar. The energy & water costs in our current agriculture/meat production systems are too high. We may not be able to finagle massive increases in crop yields in order to keep up with rising populations, even if the rate of rise seems to be stabilizing. What happens when people are hungry?

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    Just AnotherPerson (10-06-2018)

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    Quote Originally Posted by southwest88 View Post
    Yep, a lot of related issues: Too much fertilizer used on crops, the excess runs off into the water system - either the water table or into rivers, & eventually to the oceans - where it creates dead zones. Fertilizers in the US are typically made from natural gas, so if the price of natural gas rises sufficiently, there will be natural incentives to apply just enough fertilizer. We need to find ways to get drug residues & other biological/chemical contaminants out of water we take into water treatment plants, clean up, & then return to the water table or rivers.

    Further down the line - we need to find alternatives to feeding crops to cattle, pigs, etc. for meat animals. It may mean eating further down the food chain - textured soy or something similar. The energy & water costs in our current agriculture/meat production systems are too high. We may not be able to finagle massive increases in crop yields in order to keep up with rising populations, even if the rate of rise seems to be stabilizing. What happens when people are hungry?
    This run-off issue is a much bigger and immediate concern than global warming.
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    Miami will be underwater soon. Its drinking water could go first
    https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/real...cid=spartanntp

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    Climate change is slowly pulling that machine apart. Barring a stupendous reversal in greenhouse gas emissions, the rising Atlantic will cover much of Miami by the end of this century. The economic effects will be devastating: Zillow Inc. estimates that six feet of sea-level rise would put a quarter of Miami’s homes underwater, rendering $200 billion of real estate worthless. But global warming poses a more immediate danger: The permeability that makes the aquifer so easily accessible also makes it vulnerable. “It’s very easy to contaminate our aquifer,” says Rachel Silverstein, executive director of Miami Waterkeeper, a local environmental protection group. And the consequences could be sweeping. “Drinking water supply is always an existential question.”

    County officials agree with her. “The minute the world thinks your water supply is in danger, you’ve got a problem,” says James Murley, chief resilience officer for Miami-Dade, although he adds that the county’s water system remains “one of the best” in the U.S. The questions hanging over Miami and the rest of Southeast Florida are how long it can keep its water safe, and at what cost. As the region struggles with more visible climate problems, including increasingly frequent flooding and this summer’s toxic algae blooms, the risks to the aquifer grow, and they’re all the more insidious for being out of sight. If Miami-Dade can’t protect its water supply, whether it can handle the other manifestations of climate change won’t matter.

    We are all brothers and sisters in humanity. We are all made from the same dust of stars. We cannot be separated because all life is interconnected.

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    When In Drought: States Take On Urgent Negotiations To Avoid Colorado River Crisis
    https://www.npr.org/2018/10/14/65634...do-river-crisi

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    In 2007, years into a record-breaking drought throughout the southwestern U.S., officials along the Colorado River finally came to an agreement on how they'd deal with future water shortages — and then quietly hoped that wet weather would return.


    But it didn't.

    Those states are now back at the negotiating table to hammer out new deals to avoid a slow-moving crisis on the river system that supports 40 million people in seven Western states.

    The extent of the problem can be seen in a place like Page, Ariz., on the southern edge of Lake Powell, the second-largest reservoir in the country.


    Jennifer Pitt, who works on Colorado River policy for the National Audubon Society, is standing on an overlook peering down at the lake itself and the giant concrete dam holding it in place.

    "Now you can tell that there's a river here underneath this reservoir because it has somewhat of a linear shape," Pitt says, tracing the red rock canyon with her finger. "And it's wending its way towards where we're standing, here, overlooking the Glen Canyon Dam."


    The canyon beyond the dam is stained with a stark white ring. This past year was one of the driest on record, and this spring the reservoir only received about a third of the amount of water it does in an average year.


    For the past 20 years, Pitt says, demands for water have outstripped the supply, meaning Lake Powell and its sister reservoir, Lake Mead further downstream, continue to drop. Both are less than half full.

    Pitt says without changes to how the two human-made lakes are managed, they could plummet to levels where no water can be released, referred to as "dead pool."

    "If that happened, that would be a catastrophe for this region's economy, for all of the people who depend on the Colorado River, and for all of the wildlife that depends on it as well," Pitt says.

    Drought contingency planning

    That dystopian future of shuttered farms, dried up streams and water-stressed cities is one water managers, like the Upper Colorado River Commission's James Eklund, are attempting to avoid.

    "Take Lake Mead," Eklund says. "More is being taken out than comes into it. Like your bank account, if you do that over a sustained period you will run a deficit, and if you're talking about water for 40 million people and economies that are massive — [the] fifth largest economy in the world [is what] the Colorado River Basin represents — then that's significant.

    "
    Water managers are attempting to boost reservoir levels with a suite of agreements under the umbrella of "drought contingency planning." The premise is simple: Cut water use now, and use that saved water to bump up Powell and Mead to help to avoid bigger problems in the future, when supplies are likely to be even tighter.

    Water officials in Colorado, Utah, New Mexico and Wyoming are working on a plan that covers the river's Upper Basin and focuses on boosting snowpack with weather modification, better managing existing reservoirs and creating a water bank in Lake Powell.


    We are all brothers and sisters in humanity. We are all made from the same dust of stars. We cannot be separated because all life is interconnected.

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