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Thread: Should all law enforcement carry Narcan

  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cletus View Post
    His idea actually isn't a bad one if you look at in a military context.

    Every soldier should carry at least a pressure bandage as part of his basic kit. If he is wounded, whoever responds to him will use the wounded man's own bandage on him. You could do the same with junkies. Tell them if they are carrying Narcan, the first responder will use it on them. If they are not carrying any... oh, well.
    The Army individual first aid kit is more advanced than the old pressure bandage that used to be part of our kit.

    The Individual First Aid Kit increases individual warfighter capabilities to provide Self-Aid/Buddy-Aid and provides interventions for two leading causes of death on the battlefield, severe hemorrhage and inadequate airway. These capabilities increase soldier survivability during dispersed operations and the expandable pouch allows for METT-C specific “add-ins.”

    The IFAK was issued to every deploying Soldier via the Rapid Fielding Initiative. Weighing one pound, the IFAK consists of the following expendable medical items packaged inside of a modified MOLLE 100 round SAW ammo pouch.
    1 Utility Pouch 1 Tourniquet1 Elastic bandage kit 1 Bandage GA4-1/2” 100’s 1 Surgical adhesive tape 1 Nasopharyngeal airway kit 4 Surgical gloves 1 Combat gauze dressing
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  2. #102

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cletus View Post
    His idea actually isn't a bad one if you look at in a military context.

    Every soldier should carry at least a pressure bandage as part of his basic kit. If he is wounded, whoever responds to him will use the wounded man's own bandage on him. You could do the same with junkies. Tell them if they are carrying Narcan, the first responder will use it on them. If they are not carrying any... oh, well.
    An opiate overdose can happen in like 10 seconds without a person realizing until they stop breathing or lose consciousness. Sure, it would be handy for every person abusing opiates to carry around Narcan, but it's also probably going to be useless unless someone else is there to administer it.

    I mentioned earlier that public services in a few Canadian cities were handing out Narcan to groups of homeless users or known users and the overdose-related death rate dropped pretty drastically because they could use it on each other in emergencies, before police or paramedics arrive. We are talking about police being allowed to administer it, but the reality is that people are dying at an alarming rate because an overdose happens so quickly. Yes, police should be allowed to use and carry it. Yes, people should also be carrying it but it is probably going to have to be a friend or family member that administers it.

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    Cletus's Avatar Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter1469 View Post
    The Army individual first aid kit is more advanced than the old pressure bandage that used to be part of our kit.
    I didn't even think about IFAK. I have one on the vest in my active shooter kit.

    Good catch.
    Gentlemen and ladies, I hate inflation, I hate taxes, and I hate Communism. Do something about it. Ronald Reagan's instructions to his first assembled Cabinet.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cletus View Post
    I didn't even think about IFAK. I have one on the vest in my active shooter kit.

    Good catch.
    Me and the Wife have some good first aid kits here. One is pretty advanced.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adelaide View Post
    Hospitals don't go, "Well, this person dying of a drug overdose doesn't have insurance so we probably shouldn't administer Narcan" when faced with that situation. How much value would you place on a human life? Does $20-$40 seem reasonable? That is the cost of generic naloxone.
    How large is that bubble you're in?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cletus View Post
    His idea actually isn't a bad one if you look at in a military context.

    Every soldier should carry at least a pressure bandage as part of his basic kit. If he is wounded, whoever responds to him will use the wounded man's own bandage on him. You could do the same with junkies. Tell them if they are carrying Narcan, the first responder will use it on them. If they are not carrying any... oh, well.
    When I was in the Army, we all did carry pressure dressings and other first aid items. We carried injectors to self administer a nerve agent antidote if needed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Adelaide View Post
    An opiate overdose can happen in like 10 seconds without a person realizing until they stop breathing or lose consciousness. Sure, it would be handy for every person abusing opiates to carry around Narcan, but it's also probably going to be useless unless someone else is there to administer it.

    I mentioned earlier that public services in a few Canadian cities were handing out Narcan to groups of homeless users or known users and the overdose-related death rate dropped pretty drastically because they could use it on each other in emergencies, before police or paramedics arrive. We are talking about police being allowed to administer it, but the reality is that people are dying at an alarming rate because an overdose happens so quickly. Yes, police should be allowed to use and carry it. Yes, people should also be carrying it but it is probably going to have to be a friend or family member that administers it.

    This is why FAMILIES are trained and given the Narcan. No addict is going to walk around with his narcan.

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