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Thread: Trees of old

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    Tahuyaman's Avatar Senior Member
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    We now have forested / timbered lands which weren't forested hundreds of years ago. This is a good thing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Just AnotherPerson View Post
    Not to mention the bigger trees absorb much more CO2. But also trees stop absorbing CO2 during drought. And it seems that we are in a drought almost every year now. This does not bode well. It does not take too much logic to understand the consequences of this.
    We aren't in a drought every year. I can't remember the last drought in the timber regions of the Pacific NW.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tahuyaman View Post
    We aren't in a drought every year. I can't remember the last drought in the timber regions of the Pacific NW.
    I also live in the pacific northwest. Where I live there was most certainly a drought last year it was bad. All of the grasses died, they were crispafied. Trees were dying. Ash fell from the sky for a few months from forest fires. Not just in Washington but all over our nation, and this year an even worse drought is expected. Last year we had the least rain in over 40 years during the summer. I remember there was not a drop of rain.

    Here is last years https://www.drought.gov/drought/docu...e-july-31-2018

    The year before https://www.drought.gov/drought/cale...cember-18-2017

    back to 2015 https://agfax.com/2015/07/16/pacific...cord-heat-dtn/

    There are tons more links but this is enough to prove that yes we have been in droughts for years now.
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    Quote Originally Posted by donttread View Post
    Wow. I've seen "virgin" white pines that I thought were huge but they are nothing like this.
    It is amazing right!?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Strangelove View Post
    I have seen all these big trees! I lived in a Redwood forest in Felton, CA for years,and Ben Lomond.They are awesome!
    But there are a few negatives here about the Redwood forest;

    You never get to see the sun, even in summer, and there are these giant Redwood Spiders that inhabit them! They drop down on you and leave blood, even tho you don't feel the bite. And they are in the coastal fog belt.But there is rarely any summer heat wave, which is good.Oh, and you get a constant tree drip during the winter rains which lasts a long time. But, all in all, they are a big plus!

    Now I live in a mobile home park at 2000' elevation in the Sierra foothills. We have giant Ponderosa pines, Cedars and marvelous spreading Oaks. But the fire danger is very real during our bone dry summers, and in winter those big trees can blow down.

    The fate of the Paradise fire is very much on our minds!
    I would love to see the redwoods one day. That is an amazing elevation you live at, wow. That sounds awesome, except maybe those spiders though....eeeee….. :) Well I hadn't thought about not getting sun. I guess that could be a drawback. Where I live now I don't get to see sunsets. The trees block them out. Back when I lived in the tricities the sunsets were magnificent. The sky was so open. The skies would be blazing orange. The sunsets were different every day, some looked like fire, some were purple. Just so beautiful. But where I live now away from the city lights the stars are amazing. That is one drawback of the city is the star light is drowned out by the city lights. Here are some sunset pics from the tricities so you can see what I mean. Hanford sunsets don't play! LoL.

    1a234.jpg 1a235.jpg 1a236.jpg
    Last edited by Just AnotherPerson; 05-15-2019 at 02:00 AM.
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    donttread's Avatar Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sergeant Gleed View Post
    And the Indians, so closely sensitive to nature like they are, killed the last mammoth.

    Trees will grow back.

    True mammoths are gone forever.

    Thanks, indians.
    We aren't sure what killed the mammoths, probably climate change oddly enough. But trees will not grow back like these. Most of our trees are young. Farm land left for the forest to reclaim or timber harvested every 30 years or so. It's not all bad , new growth forest have some advantages over old forest , but there is something about seeing the giants of any species that inspires awe.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Who View Post
    In old growth forests, the underbrush is generally killed off by fire every couple of years. The forest survives. Today, forest fires destroy thousands of hectares of forest entirely. I agree, the underbrush should be cut away, but there should be more effort made to plant the kind of trees that become "old growth" and not just weed trees for lumber.
    Someone may have covered this in the interim from your original post to here, but I disagree with your statement of 'weed trees' for lumber. Silvaculture and reforestation is taken very seriously, and before old growth trees are cut, plans for the reforestation are usually submitted to government entities that monitor lumber harvesting and must be approved before any tree is removed.

    Just because a company owns a piece of land that contains trees, does not mean they can freely strip it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Just AnotherPerson View Post
    I also live in the pacific northwest. Where I live there was most certainly a drought last year it was bad. All of the grasses died, they were crispafied. Trees were dying. Ash fell from the sky for a few months from forest fires. Not just in Washington but all over our nation, and this year an even worse drought is expected. Last year we had the least rain in over 40 years during the summer. I remember there was not a drop of rain.

    Here is last years https://www.drought.gov/drought/docu...e-july-31-2018

    The year before https://www.drought.gov/drought/cale...cember-18-2017

    back to 2015 https://agfax.com/2015/07/16/pacific...cord-heat-dtn/

    There are tons more links but this is enough to prove that yes we have been in droughts for years now.
    I live every summer in the Pacific NW. A couple years ago we had a terrible forest fire situation in places. The fires were started by prople being careless with fireworks and they could have been quickly contained if we ignored environmentalists like you and returned to responsible forestry practices. No rain for a couple of weeks is not a drought.

    In imy area we had ash falling from the sky and thick smoke. All of it was from a Canadian fire where they just let them burn.

    There is no drought in the pacific NW. The weather there is the way it usually is. Cyclical. Sometimes mild, wet and cool spring and summer. Then a warmer and drier spring and summer. Same with winters. Sometimes mild and a low snow pack in the mountains and sometimes the opposite.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Collateral Damage View Post
    Someone may have covered this in the interim from your original post to here, but I disagree with your statement of 'weed trees' for lumber. Silvaculture and reforestation is taken very seriously, and before old growth trees are cut, plans for the reforestation are usually submitted to government entities that monitor lumber harvesting and must be approved before any tree is removed.

    Just because a company owns a piece of land that contains trees, does not mean they can freely strip it.
    In the Pacific NW you can't buy a piece of timbered land and harvest the trees without a permit from the government. You must submit a workable plan for reforestation. Even then an application is sometimes denied.

    The odd thing is, a friend of mine owned a piece of land, about five acres on the edge of the city limit. It was filled with a variety of trees, alder, douglas fir, hemlock and maples. The county made him cut down every tree as they declared it an "attractive nuisance" because homeless were camping in the property. Now the property is basically worthless. He could sell it to a developer for pennies on the dollar.



    One of the problems in past reforestation efforts was that they replanted too many trees on the logged area. This resulted in trees which were basically starved for nutrition as they were growing. We have developed better techniques today.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tahuyaman View Post
    In the Pacific NW you can't buy a piece of timbered land and harvest the trees without a permit from the government. You must submit a workable plan for reforestation. Even then an application is sometimes denied.
    The odd thing is, a friend of mine owned a piece of land, about five acres on the edge of the city limit. It was filled with a variety of trees, alder, douglas fir, hemlock and maples. The county made him cut down every tree as they declared it an "attractive nuisance" because homeless were camping in the property. Now the property is basically worthless. He could sell it to a developer for pennies on the dollar.
    One of the problems in past reforestation efforts was that they replanted too many trees on the logged area. This resulted in trees which were basically starved for nutrition as they were growing. We have developed better techniques today.
    I could not imagine the county could demand such a thing unless the trees were diseased, endangering public property, or overhanging other property. The campong of vagrants on the property would not require the removal of trees. If all the facts are correct, then whomever demanded the removal of the trees was way over their authority.

    Many decades ago, in a land far, far away, I studied reforestation and silviculture in preparation for college. My shift to architecture in senior year of high school overshadowed my love of the forests. And here I sit, crunching numbers to pay my bills, lol.
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