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Thread: How SpaceX's new Starship launch system compares to NASA's towering moon rockets

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    How SpaceX's new Starship launch system compares to NASA's towering moon rockets

    How SpaceX's new Starship launch system compares to NASA's towering moon rockets

    It is bigger.


    The energy required to launch three people out to the moon, land two of them on its surface, and bring everyone back to Earth is a monstrous amount. To get that job done during its Apollo program, NASA created the Saturn V rocket.
    Each Saturn V rocket stood about 363 feet (111 meters) tall and 33 feet (10 meters) wide. The scale is hard to fathom, but it's akin to filling up a small skyscraper with enough liquid fuel and oxidizer to level a small town.


    The giant machine powered the world's first crewed moon-landing mission — the Apollo 11 astronauts stepped onto the moon on July 20, 1969. Five more moon landings followed, though no one has returned in decades.


    Now, 50 years later, private interests have set their sights on sending people back to the moon. Blue Origin, founded by the billionaire Jeff Bezos, is pressing for a lunar return, as is SpaceX, the aerospace company founded by Elon Musk.
    Molon labe
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    CCitizen (08-14-2019),countryboy (08-14-2019)

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    Very interesting. I hope they succeed.

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    Peter1469 (08-15-2019)

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    I recently listened to an audio-book called, "The Man Who Knew the Way to the Moon". About a guy named John Houbolt, a junior engineer at NASA who pioneered the LOR (Lunar Orbit Rendezvous) mode of getting men on the moon, especially within the rushed time frame imposed by JFK. He was completely rejected, and took drastic measures to get NASA to take his idea seriously. Famous rocket scientist Werner Von Braun envisioned a single huge rocket ship to take the astronauts all the way to the moon, and land the huge ship on the lunar surface, then return the entire gargantuan rocket ship to Earth. So, as much fuel and bulk as it took even using LOR to land men on the moon, Von Braun's vision would've required a rocket ship even more gargantuan than the Saturn V. Super interesting listen, since it also interviews some of the people actually involved, as well as scientists currently working on returning to the moon. You could subscribe to Audible and get it free, then cancel. I thought maybe you could get it from the library, but I see now it's an Audible exclusive.

    https://www.audible.com/pd/The-Man-W...ook/B07T1F4MB7

    The story of John C. Houbolt, an unsung hero of Apollo 11 and the man who showed NASA how to put America on the moon.

    Without John C. Houbolt, a junior engineer at NASA, Apollo 11 would never have made it to the moon.

    Top NASA engineers on the project, including Werner Von Braun, strongly advocated for a single, huge spacecraft to travel to the moon, land, and return to Earth. It's the scenario used in 1950s cartoons and horror movies about traveling to outer space.

    Houbolt had another idea: Lunar Orbit Rendezvous. LOR would link two spacecraft in orbit while the crafts were travelling at 17,000 miles per hour. His plan was ridiculed and considered unthinkable. But this junior engineer was irrepressible. He stood by his concept, fired off memos to executives, and argued that LOR was the only way to success.

    For the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11, hear the untold story of the man who helped fulfill Kennedy’s challenge to reach the moon and begin exploring the final frontier.

    Progressivism, ideas so good, they have to be mandatory

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