User Tag List

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 2 of 2

Thread: A Very Old Man for a Wolf - Oregon Wolf Management Story

  1. #1

    tPF Moderator
    Points: 81,795, Level: 69
    Level completed: 73%, Points required for next Level: 655
    Overall activity: 41.0%
    Achievements:
    Recommendation Second ClassSocial50000 Experience PointsTagger First ClassYour first GroupVeteran
    DGUtley's Avatar tPF Moderator
    Karma
    170056
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Northeast Ohio
    Posts
    19,921
    Points
    81,795
    Level
    69
    Thanks Given
    6,793
    Thanked 15,318x in 8,791 Posts
    Mentioned
    534 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Post A Very Old Man for a Wolf - Oregon Wolf Management Story

    A Very Old Man for a Wolf. Interesting and somewhat sad story on the management of wolves in Oregon. We've got coyotes and foxes in Ohio. Wolves, I don't know.


    https://getpocket.com/explore/item/a...man-for-a-wolf


    The Female Mate:

    OR2.jpg


    The Alpha male:
    OR4.jpg
    Any time you give a man something he doesn't earn, you cheapen him. Our kids earn what they get, and that includes respect. -- Woody Hayes​

  2. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to DGUtley For This Useful Post:

    Collateral Damage (11-19-2019),Common (12-02-2019),Cotton1 (11-19-2019),Dr. Who (12-01-2019)

  3. #2
    Points: 6,350, Level: 18
    Level completed: 47%, Points required for next Level: 700
    Overall activity: 13.0%
    Achievements:
    Veteran5000 Experience Points
    Nemo's Avatar Member
    Karma
    91
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    184
    Points
    6,350
    Level
    18
    Thanks Given
    12
    Thanked 103x in 70 Posts
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It was a mistake to take the gray wolf (Canus lupus) off the endangered species list. Wolves are critical to preserving the natural balance of wildlife. It is well established that wolves subsist primarily on mice and voles; which otherwise would rapidly increase cyclic population growth causing damage to the ecosystem, adversely affecting reindeer (Rangifer tarandus "caribou") and other grass-feeding animals that inhabit the northern hemisphere, and the indigenous peoples that depend on them. Wolves also play an important role in culling weak or sick animals necessary to maintaining the health of these migratory herds. It is also known that the major threat to the caribou has not been due over-predation by wolves; but rather the oil pipeline that has interrupted their migration to calving grounds resulting in herd decimation. There is evidence that the caribou is adapting to this man-made obstacle by adjusting their migratory patterns; however this has taken time and taken its toll. Likewise the claim that wolves pose a serious threat to humans and domestic livestock is apocryphal. Wolves are shy and afraid of human contact; and a single Pyrenean dog is sufficient to keep a whole pack of wolves away. In sum, if we kill off the wolves, we change the environment - and not for the better. We should be wary of our short-sighted opinions, and the more mindful of the consequences of our decisions affecting our environment, for opinionum commenta delet dies, naturae judicia confirmat "time obliterates the fictions of opinion, and confirms the decisions of nature." - Cicero, De Natura Deorum, II, ii: 5.

  4. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Nemo For This Useful Post:

    DGUtley (12-01-2019),Dr. Who (12-01-2019)

+ Reply to Thread

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Single Sign On provided by vBSSO