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  1. #11
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    waltky's Avatar Senior Member
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    Cool

    Could become an increasingly important food source in the future...

    Genetic Study May Make Ancient Inca's Quinoa a Grain of the Future
    February 08, 2017 - Quinoa, the sacred "mother grain" of the ancient Inca civilization suppressed by Spanish conquistadors, could become an increasingly important food source in the future thanks to genetic secrets revealed in a new study.
    Scientists on Wednesday said they have mapped the genome of quinoa and identified a gene that could be manipulated to get rid of the grain's natural bitter taste and pave the way for more widespread commercial use. Quinoa already grows well in harsh conditions such as salty and low-quality soil, high elevations and cool temperatures, meaning it can flourish in locales where common cereal crops like wheat and rice may struggle. But the presence of toxic and bitter chemicals called saponins in its seeds has been one of the impediments to extensive cultivation.


    A man holds quinoa grains at a marketplace for small- and medium-sized quinoa growers in Challapata, Oruro Department, south of La Paz, Bolivia

    Plant scientist Mark Tester of King Abdullah University of Science and Technology in Saudi Arabia said the research pinpointed a gene that guides production of saponins in quinoa. This knowledge could enable breeding of quinoa without saponins, to make the seeds sweeter. Currently, quinoa grain must be processed through washing and drying after harvest to remove saponins. "Quinoa is currently greatly under-utilized," said Tester, who led the research published in the journal Nature. "It is highly nutritious, with a high protein content that, importantly, has a very good balance of amino acids, which is unusual for our major grains. It is gluten free and high in vitamins and minerals, too."

    Increased quinoa production could improve food security on a planet with unrelenting human population growth, Tester said. There are potential disadvantages to reducing saponins, perhaps increasing susceptibility to fungal infections or bird predation, Tester added. Quinoa, which boasts a nutty flavor, can be used the same ways as rice and wheat. It can be cooked and served on its own, turned into pasta, put in soups, eaten as a cereal or fermented to make beer or chicha, a beverage of the Andes.


    Aymara indigenous women grind grains of quinoa in Oruro, Bolivia

    The crop was sacred to the ancient Incas, who called it "chisoya mama," or the "mother grain." During their South American conquest 500 years ago, Spaniards suppressed quinoa cultivation because of its use in indigenous religious ceremonies. They forbade quinoa cultivation for a time, with the Incas forced to grow wheat instead. Quinoa is still a minor crop globally, grown mostly in Peru and Bolivia. It has become fashionable in the West in recent years, primarily as a health food.

    http://www.voanews.com/a/genetic-stu...e/3715676.html

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    Trumpster's Avatar Member
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    Quinoa is technically not a grain but a seed; therefore, it likely has a low glycemic index. It's a good source of (complete) protein so it would be especially good in a vegan meal.
    Last edited by Trumpster; 02-21-2017 at 09:47 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by oceanloverOH View Post
    Sometimes it can be a challenge to prepare a meal that meets my diabetic needs but is still delicious so that hubby (who doesn't have the restrictions I do) will enjoy it. I have some recipes that fit the bill; making one tonight:



    ZUCCHINI CASSEROLE

    1 pound ground beef
    1 small onion, chopped
    3 Tbsp butter
    3 small zucchini, sliced in half moons
    ½ pound fresh sliced mushrooms
    1 to 2 Tbsp minced garlic
    1 tsp coarsely ground black pepper
    1 can cream of mushroom soup
    3 ounces mild cheddar cheese (about ¾cup), shredded
    1 ounce mild cheddar cheese (about ¼ cup), shredded (for topping)
    Pam baking spray

    Brown ground beef with onion in a skillet; drain fat. Sauté the zucchini, mushrooms, garlic and pepper in butter in a large saucepot or Dutch oven until almost tender; add in cooked and drained ground beef. Stir mushroom soup and 3/4 cup cheese into meat and vegetable mixture. Put contents of pot into 13X9X2 glass baking dish that has been sprayed with Pam and layer evenly. Top with remaining cheese. Bake at 325º for 30 minutes or until hot and bubbly.

    Makes about 4 servings; 25g carbs per serving

    Note: If you're not so concerned about carbs, this dish can be made heartier by the addition of 2 cups of cooked brown rice. Cook the rice according to package directions, and mix into the beef/vegetable mixture along with the soup and cheese; the rest of the recipe is the same.
    Just a note of caution: A common mistake is to concentrate on meeting the needs of one health issue at a time, like diabetes. But diabetics, for example, are also prone to heart disease, cancer, arthritis, osteoporosis etc. So we need to ask if the daily meals are optimal for the prevention of all the major degenerative diseases, not just one.
    Last edited by Trumpster; 02-21-2017 at 09:48 AM.

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