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Thread: More Marine Corps female combat tests

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    Cool

    Woman Holds National Guard's Top Enlisted Post...

    1st Woman to Hold National Guard's Top Enlisted Post
    17 Nov 2017 — A 23-year veteran of the U.S. military now serving as the top enlisted leader of the New York Army and Air National Guard is the first woman to hold the position.
    State officials say Air National Command Chief Master Sgt. Amy Giaquinto took over the new post last month. The agency says she also became the first Air Guard noncommissioned officer to hold the job of senior enlisted adviser to the top ranked general in the New York National Guard.


    Chief Master Sgt. Amy Giaquinto, senior enlisted leader, New York Air National Guard, addresses African partner senior enlisted leaders, about the State Partnership Program, Nov. 10, 2017.

    The position had been held by male New York Army National Guard command sergeant majors since it was created in the 1970s.

    Giaquinto's military career began in 1984, with a three-year stint in the U.S. Army. After a 10-year break in service, the Ballston Spa resident joined the Air Guard's 109th Airlift Wing in Schenectady County.

    http://www.military.com/daily-news/2...sted-post.html

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    I said from the beginning that most women would have great difficulty being combat marines and its because of nature.

    Men in good physical condition are stronger and larger then women in good physical condition estimates are lb for lb men in good condtion are 1/3 stronger than a woman in good condtion. That of course is average, larger males in good condition the spread is wider.

    There are those that keep wishing and hoping that women are the same as men.

    There was an OLD cartoon from when I was kid, with a toddler boy and girl pulling open their diapers and looking and they both had a shocked looked on thier face. I believe its a rockwell

    Yes theres a difference
    Last edited by Common; 11-20-2017 at 02:40 AM.
    Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies.

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    Granny says, "Dat's right - you go, ladies...

    6 Bragg Women Become First in Army to Earn Expert Infantryman Badge
    24 Jan 2018 - Women quietly broke through barriers last fall when they became the first in the Army to earn the prestigious Expert Infantryman Badge at Fort Bragg, North Carolina.
    The badge, which was created in the 1940s, only recently opened to women when the Department of Defense struck down regulations that prevented them from serving in infantry jobs. The women earned the badge during testing with hundreds of male candidates in November -- about two years after infantry jobs opened to women. "This historic achievement is a reminder of the great things we can achieve when women are seen and treated as equals and given the same chance to contribute to their country," U.S. Sen. Tammy Duckworth said in a statement. The Democrat from Illinois was among the first Army women to fly combat missions during Operation Iraqi Freedom.


    A soldier wears the Expert Infantry Badge after completing all the requirements.

    In 2004, Duckworth was deployed to Iraq as a Black Hawk pilot for the Illinois Army National Guard when it was struck down by a rocket-propelled grenade. She lost her legs and partial use of her right arm. "These six incredible women prove exactly why the Department of Defense was right to allow women to serve in all military roles, an action that was long overdue," she said. "Remember, women have served attached to infantry units for decades without being formally assigned to the unit -- so even when they meet the requirements, they technically could not earn the EIB until now." Through a spokesman for the 82nd Airborne Division, all six women who earned the badge declined to talk about their achievement or the significance of the badge. The division did not name the women. Division leaders declined interview requests for this story.

    Earning the Badge

    To earn the Expert Infantryman Badge, a soldier must successfully complete 30 tasks that prove mastery infantry skills. If a soldier makes three errors, he or she fails and must wait one year to try again. At Fort Bragg, soldiers were tested on weapons proficiency and medical and patrol skills. Soldiers assembled the Carl Gustav recoilless rifle, claymore mine, Javelin and AK-47 weapons systems. Among medical tasks, they performed first aid for a suspected fracture, open head wound, open abdominal wound and burns. In the patrol lane, soldiers decontaminated themselves and equipment, identified terrain features on a map and applied camouflage. The testing takes place over several days, during the day and at night.

    Of the 1,000 candidates who tested for the badge at Fort Bragg in November, 287 earned it. The candidates came from Fort Bragg, U.S. Army Special Operations Command, 18th Airborne Corps and units at Fort Stewart, Georgia. Traditionally, only about 18 percent of all candidates who test for the badge earn it. Testing for the Expert Infantryman Badge is conducted at several installations each year. Standards for the test are set by the Infantry School at Fort Benning, Georgia.

    A 'Soldier Skill'

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    Red face

    Uncle Ferd likes to watch womens train fer combat...

    Third Female Marine Now in Selection to Become MARSOC Raider
    30 Jan 2018 - Another female candidate has quietly made it through most of the first phase of the assessment and selection process of Marine Corps Special Operations Command in a quest to become the first female MARSOC Raider.
    A 25-year-old female sergeant has almost completed the 21-day first phase of A&S after beginning the course Jan. 16, MARSOC spokesman Maj. Nicholas Mannweiler confirmed to Military.com. The sergeant, who comes from the food specialist military occupational specialty, is on her first attempt through the phase. If she makes it to the end of the course, which wraps up the week of Feb. 5, with a high enough aggregate academic and physical training score, she will be the first woman to enter the challenging and secretive second phase of MARSOC assessment and selection. But that is not a given. Mannweiler said it's expected that a number of candidates will leave the selection pipeline at the phase’s conclusion with insufficient scores. If she does make it through, the second phase of A&S is set to begin Feb. 10.

    To date, one other woman has made it to the end of the first phase of A&S: a corporal from an administrative MOS, whose identity has not been made public to protect her privacy. While she reached the end of the course in August 2016, her scores were not high enough to continue. Military.com reported last year that she planned to repeat the course; Mannweiler confirmed this week that she is still pursuing a second attempt in the summer timeframe. "A female candidate who previously attempted A&S has communicated interest in attempting Phase 1 again to our recruiting teams," he said. "Her next opportunity, if she meets time in grade and time in service ceilings, would be the next A&S later this year."


    Candidates perform pull-ups during Phase I of the U.S. Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command's Assessment and Selection course aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C.

    A third female candidate, a staff sergeant from an administrative background, also attempted A&S in August 2016 but exited the course after a day after failing to complete the time requirement on a ruck march. During the first phase of A&S, Marines, who must meet specific physical and aptitude prerequisites, must demonstrate that they can complete a 12-mile march carrying a pack weighing more than 45 pounds within three hours; swim 300 meters while in combat uniform; and pass a variety of classroom exercises. After a woman graduated the Marines' legendarily difficult Infantry Officer Course in September, elite roles within special operations became the final hurdle for gender integration in the military.

    While a number of women have graduated the Army's Ranger school, the Army has yet to graduate the first female Green Beret, the Navy the first SEAL, or the Air Force the first Tactical Air Control Party airman. MARSOC officials have said the command has taken an aggressive approach to recruiting women, with recruiters reaching out directly to eligible female candidates to inform them of the opportunity.

    https://www.military.com/daily-news/...oc-raider.html

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter1469 View Post
    More Marine Corps female combat tests

    Now here are some practical field exercises that the Marine Corps is using to test the viability of females in combat arms units. An interesting read.
    As long as they have the EXACT SAME STANDARDS, NO EXCEPTIONS, I'm fine with it. IF ANYTHING is made easier , that's complete bull$#@!.

    I stayed in Israel for nearly a year; the women in the IDF , in combat roles, did EVERTHING the guys did...PERIOD.
    De Oppresso Liber



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    Quote Originally Posted by Grokmaster View Post
    As long as they have the EXACT SAME STANDARDS, NO EXCEPTIONS, I'm fine with it. IF ANYTHING is made easier , that's complete bull$#@!.

    I stayed in Israel for nearly a year; the women in the IDF , in combat roles, did EVERTHING the guys did...PERIOD.
    Standards will be loosened.

    Sent from my evil cell phone.
    "For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places."

    Ephesians 6:12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cthulhu View Post
    Standards will be loosened.

    Sent from my evil cell phone.
    The Marines took away the pass/fail of the first day of Infantry Officer's training. I started a thread on it this weekend.
    Alea iacta est

    Check out the blog.


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    Letting females into the infantry and special operations is still a bad idea.

    That said, it won't matter much in the grand scheme of things. The fate of the US empire is already decided.
    Two things awe me most, the starry sky above me and the moral law within me.
    --Immanuel Kant

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    Re-ups for Female Submariners on Par with Men...

    Retention of Female Submariners on Par with Men
    8 Mar 2018 — When the U.S. Navy sought the first female sailors to serve on submarines, Suraya Mattocks raised her hand because she had always thought it would be a cool job, not because she wanted to blaze a trail. She did anyway.
    It has been eight years since the Navy lifted its ban on women in submarines. The chaos and disruption some predicted largely haven't materialized. Women like Mattocks are focused on doing their jobs well. Their retention rates are, to some surprise to the Navy, on par with those of men, according to records obtained by The Associated Press. And they want to be seen simply as "submariners," not "female submariners." "That'll be a great day when it's not so new that everyone wants to talk about it," Mattocks told the AP in a rare interview. "Females on my crew, they really and truly just want to be seen as submariners. That's it." The Navy began bringing female officers on board submarines in 2010; enlisted female sailors followed five years later. By now, the first 19 female officers have decided whether to sign a contract to go back to sea as a department head, which keeps them on the career path for a submarine officer, or have chosen a different path. Five women signed. Fourteen women have either left the military, will soon leave or are serving elsewhere in the Navy, according to records requested by the AP.

    That's a retention rate of 26 percent for the first female officers, just shy of the roughly 27 percent of male officers selected for submarine service in 2010 who signed a department head contract. The Navy had been looking for at least 15 percent for women. Nine more female officers were picked for submarine service in 2010, but with the intention they would return to jobs in the supply departments on surface ships or ashore — a normal career path. "You always want higher" numbers, said Adm. John Richardson, the chief of naval operations, but he is encouraged by the initial results and the growing number of female officer candidates who want to be submariners. "I think if there was a sense it was not doing well, we wouldn't have those types of numbers," he said. Richardson led the submarine force at the beginning of the integration, from late 2010 to 2012. At that time, some submarine veterans, wives of submariners and active-duty members were calling the change a mistake. The living quarters were too tight, there was little privacy and romantic relationships could develop, they feared.


    U.S. Navy YN1 Suraya Mattocks, one of the first female enlisted sailors to be selected to serve on submarines, poses for a portrait at the U.S. Naval Undersea Museum near her base in Keyport, Wash. The Navy began bringing female officers on board submarines in 2010, followed by enlisted female sailors five years later. Their retention rates are on par with those of men, according to records obtained by The Associated Press.

    Many now say that the transition went smoothly, with one major exception. Male sailors were prosecuted in 2015 for secretly videotaping female officers and trainees as they undressed on the USS Wyoming. "They did court-martial the perpetrators. It wasn't laughed off, and that's a good thing," said retired Navy Capt. Lory Manning, director of government relations for the Service Women's Action Network. "I don't think, in general, it dampens the effort." To address privacy, the Navy is retrofitting subs with extra doors and designated washrooms. Future subs will be built with the height, reach and strength of women in mind. Mattocks is on the USS Michigan, a sub that splits its time between Washington state and Guam. Sailors have in some cases organically changed their behavior to accommodate changing times. Some accustomed to sleeping in their underwear now don a robe or sweats to go to the bathroom, for instance, in case they encounter another gender in the hall. "That goes for both sides. It's not that all females have to wear this and males can do whatever they want," Mattocks said. "It's just little things like that, having both genders in a small space. You figure out things you never would've thought of before."

    One-fifth of submarine crews are integrated. It will take until about 2026 before a woman could be in command of a U.S. Navy submarine. Lt. Marquette Leveque, 29, is finishing her assignment this summer as the women in submarines coordinator, in which she manages the integration, advises Navy leaders and helps mentor future applicants. She is proud of her service as one of the first female officers on the USS Wyoming, she told the AP. Among her peers, one was selected by NASA as an astronaut candidate, others joined the corporate world or moved to different Navy jobs. Some are new mothers. Mattocks, a 34-year-old yeoman first class from Dover, New Hampshire, will soon retire from the Navy. She said she probably would have chosen to stay in the submarine force if it weren't so late in her naval career. She joined the Navy after graduating from high school and plans to retire when she hits 20 years of service. "I found something I love, something new in the Navy that I love," she said. "I wouldn't have gotten bored with it." Megan Stevenson, 25, trained at the Naval Submarine School in Groton, Connecticut, this spring before heading to the USS Louisiana in Bangor, Washington. Stevenson said she would sometimes get double takes. "The way I look at submarines is kind of like an astronaut," said Stevenson, of Raymond, Maine. "It's a unique experience that so few people have done; I want to experience that."

    https://www.military.com/daily-news/...s-par-men.html
    See also:

    No Plans to Open West Coast Boot Camp to Women, Top Marine Says
    8 Mar 2018 - The Marine Corps marked a major change earlier this week when it opened its combat training course on the West Coast to women for the first time.
    But the commandant said Thursday that the service's West Coast recruit depot will stay all-male, adding the Corps doesn't currently need another boot camp that trains women. Gen. Robert Neller told Military.com that cost and efficiencies were major drivers of the decision to open Marine Combat Training-West at Camp Pendleton, California, to women. MCT is the first stop after boot camp for enlisted Marines who are not training in an infantry specialty. "We recruit women from all across the country, from both east and west of the Mississippi," Neller said, following remarks at a National Defense Industrial Association event near Washington, D.C. "And we thought it would be more cost-effective if they went to MCT after they went home on recruit leave, to go to SOI on the West Coast," he said. "Maybe their families would be closer and they could see them graduate from MCT if they couldn't get up to Parris Island."

    Neller added that one of the biggest West Coast training schools for Marines is the communications-electronics school at Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center 29 Palms, California. For women entering one of these fields, it's more convenient to move from MCT at Pendleton to 29 Palms than it is to travel back from MCT-East at Camp Geiger, North Carolina. The commandant acknowledged that "cohesion reasons" also prompted the Corps to start training men and women together at MCT. But as to opening Marine Recruit Depot San Diego to women, Neller said the need is not there. The Marine Corps is the only service that still keeps separate entry-level training units for men and women. All female recruits pass through 4th Recruit Training Battalion at Parris Island, South Carolina.


    A drill instructor at Parris Island disciplines her Marine recruits with some unscheduled physical training outside their barracks

    San Diego does have a "cadre" of female staff, including drill instructors and skills instructors, Neller noted. But he said demand for more training capacity for female recruits hasn't yet materialized. "So we've got women, we're still trying to get to 10 percent," he said. "And until we do, Parris Island has enough capacity. Right now, for us to move a comparable operation out to the West Coast, we don't have enough depth yet." Neller said in 2016 that he wanted to grow the proportion of female troops in the Marine Corps to 1 in 10; currently, around 8 percent of the force is female.

    Not everyone buys the argument, though, that demand doesn't justify another integrated boot camp. Marine Corps Times reported this week that the Corps recruited 3,355 women last fiscal year. With just one recruit training battalion available to train female recruits, the outlet reported that annual capacity for recruit training maxes out at just 3,500. Kate Germano, a retired lieutenant colonel who formerly commanded 4th Recruit Training Battalion and has vigorously advocated for fully integrating entry level training, told the San Diego Union-Tribune that the Marine Corps could raise recruiting caps if there were more spots available to train women. "It hasn't happened already because they don't want it to happen," she told the outlet.

    https://www.military.com/daily-news/...rine-says.html

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    First All-Female C-130 Crew to Fly in Combat...

    First All-Female C-130 Crew to Fly in Combat Looks Back on Mission
    6 Apr 2018 - A C-130 Hercules aircrew transported 151 Marines and equipment in and out of Iraq on Sept. 26, 2005.
    It was a normal, everyday operation for the crew, hauling cargo to airfields in the Middle East. But it marked the first time an all-female crew would take on the mission. "Frankly, we were disappointed that it was 2005 before an all-female C-130 crew flew in combat," Lt. Col. Carol Mitchell, 310th Airlift Squadron commander, said in a news release. Mitchell was a captain and the aircraft commander during that flight, according to a recent Air Force release that coincided with Women's History Month in March. "We were just doing our everyday jobs, so there was nothing unusual about that day for us," she said, reflecting on the historic flight under the 386th Air Expeditionary Wing. She added, "We didn't want an all-female crew to be unusual; we wanted it to be normal. Unfortunately, it is not normal yet. In order to get there, we have to stand out to show the rest of the world what we are capable of."

    The crew included Mitchell; 1st Lt. Siobhan Couturier, pilot; Capt. Anita T. Mack, navigator; Staff Sgt. Josie E. Harshe, flight engineer; and loadmasters Tech. Sgt. Sigrid M. Carrero-Perez and Senior Airman Ci Ci Alonz. All were from the 43rd Airlift Wing at Pope Air Force Base, North Carolina. Some of their perspectives have evolved. Back in 2005, Mitchell felt that women shouldn't necessarily be singled out for doing their jobs just because of their gender. "I enjoyed flying with this crew, but I don't think we should go out of our way to have all-female crews," she said then. "It took a long time for women to become accepted as aircrew members and, now that we are, we would be taking a step back by singling ourselves out rather than blending in with the rest of the Air Force."


    From left to right, Staff Sgt. Josie E. Harshe, flight engineer; Capt. Anita T. Mack, navigator; 1st Lt. Siobhan Couturier, pilot; Capt. Carol J. Mitchell, aircraft commander; and loadmasters Tech. Sgt. Sigrid M. Carrero-Perez and Senior Airman Ci Ci Alonzo, pause in the cargo bay of their C-130 for a group photo following their historic flight.

    The message resonates 13 years later: Don't treat us differently because we're women. "I was happy to be doing our primary mission: delivering beans and bullets on time and on target," said Mack, now a lieutenant colonel and Air Mobility Command deputy division chief. "We get to have a direct impact on the folks in the field, bringing them the supplies needed to do their job and then flying them back to go home. There is a real sense of responsibility to do the best job you can do when people are depending on you," she said in the release. The crew would also fly to Afghanistan and the Horn of Africa during their deployment. Mack said performance and value are the real milestones for her career, regardless of her gender. "While it was special to be a member of this crew, I want to emphasize I have always focused on being a great navigator and officer first, rather than a woman in the Air Force," she said.

    Duff, nee Harshe, now a registered nurse with 96th Medical Group at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, was the flight engineer at the time. She looks forward to the day a female crew becomes the norm, hopefully in the near future. "If we want women serving in the military to be treated equally and for gender not to be an issue, then we should not put our gender in the spotlight and make it something 'special,' " she said. As the Air Force continues its breaking barriers initiative, Mitchell said the service as a whole should recognize women as a crucial part of the conversation. "We need to do a better job of educating society and our youth so they understand that there are no longer obstacles preventing girls from doing whatever they decide to do, even if that's being an Air Force pilot," she said. "Brave, pioneering women painstakingly removed those obstacles for us, and we need to take advantage of the opportunities they have provided," Mitchell said.

    https://www.military.com/daily-news/...k-mission.html

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