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Thread: A Simple Way to Improve Education, Cut Obesity and Prevent Crime

  1. #11
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    Red face

    Granny says, "Dat's right - Uncle Ferd's g/f not losin' any weight...

    US Obesity Problem Is Not Budging, New Data Shows
    October 13, 2017 — America's weight problem isn't getting any better, according to new government research.
    Overall, obesity figures stayed about the same: About 40 percent of adults are obese and 18.5 percent of children. Those numbers are a slight increase from the last report but the difference is so small that it could have occurred by chance. Worrisome to experts is the rate for children and teenagers, which had hovered around 17 percent for a decade. The 2-to-5 age group had the biggest rise.


    The years ahead will show if that's a statistical blip or marks the start of a real trend, said the report's lead author, Dr. Craig Hales of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The bad news is that the numbers didn't go down, experts say. In recent years, state and national health officials have focused on obesity in kids, who were the target of the national Let's Move campaign launched by former first lady Michelle Obama in 2010.




    Two women converse in New York. New government figures released Friday, Oct. 13, 2017 showed small increases that were not considered statistically significant but were seen by some as a cause for concern. The adult obesity rate rose from to about 40 percent, from just shy of 38 percent.


    The report released Friday covers 2015 and 2016. "This is quite disappointing. If we were expecting the trends to budge, this is when they would be budging," said Andrew Stokes, a Boston University expert on tracking obesity. The new figures are from an annual government survey with about 5,000 participants. The survey is considered the gold standard for measuring the nation's waistline, because participants are put on a scale to verify their weight.


    Obesity means not merely overweight, but seriously overweight, as determined by a calculation called body mass index . Until the early 1980s, only about 1 in 6 adults were obese. The rate climbed dramatically to about 1 in 3 around a decade ago, then seemed to level off for years.


    More details from the report:
    Granny says, "Dat's right - Uncle Ferd's g/f not losin' any weight...
    :redface
    US Obesity Problem Is Not Budging, New Data Shows
    October 13, 2017 — America's weight problem isn't getting any better, according to new government research.
    Overall, obesity figures stayed about the same: About 40 percent of adults are obese and 18.5 percent of children. Those numbers are a slight increase from the last report but the difference is so small that it could have occurred by chance. Worrisome to experts is the rate for children and teenagers, which had hovered around 17 percent for a decade. The 2-to-5 age group had the biggest rise.

    The years ahead will show if that's a statistical blip or marks the start of a real trend, said the report's lead author, Dr. Craig Hales of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The bad news is that the numbers didn't go down, experts say. In recent years, state and national health officials have focused on obesity in kids, who were the target of the national Let's Move campaign launched by former first lady Michelle Obama in 2010.


    Two women converse in New York. New government figures released Friday, Oct. 13, 2017 showed small increases that were not considered statistically significant but were seen by some as a cause for concern. The adult obesity rate rose from to about 40 percent, from just shy of 38 percent.

    The report released Friday covers 2015 and 2016. "This is quite disappointing. If we were expecting the trends to budge, this is when they would be budging," said Andrew Stokes, a Boston University expert on tracking obesity. The new figures are from an annual government survey with about 5,000 participants. The survey is considered the gold standard for measuring the nation's waistline, because participants are put on a scale to verify their weight.

    Obesity means not merely overweight, but seriously overweight, as determined by a calculation called body mass index . Until the early 1980s, only about 1 in 6 adults were obese. The rate climbed dramatically to about 1 in 3 around a decade ago, then seemed to level off for years.

    More details from the report:
    See also:

    WHO Warns of Child Obesity Epidemic
    October 11, 2017 — A study shows there has been a tenfold increase in the number of obese and overweight children and adolescents worldwide in just 40 years.
    In one of the biggest epidemiological studies ever undertaken, scientists with the World Health Organization and Imperial College London analyzed height and weight data for 130 million people since 1975, to get their Body Mass Index or BMI. The most dramatic changes have occurred in middle income countries in regions such as East Asia, the Middle East and North Africa, and Latin America. Lead author, Professor Majid Ezzati of Imperial College London is surprised by the speed of change. “Places that a few decades ago, there may have been very little obesity and a fair amount of underweight children, suddenly are bordering on having epidemics.” In higher income countries, rates of childhood obesity have plateaued but remain very high. In that income group, the United States had the highest obesity rates.


    An eight-month-old boy is held by his mother as they wait to see a doctor at a clinic for the obese in Bogota, Colombia

    Poor policymaking blamed

    Researchers say the global obesity epidemic is a result of food marketing and poor policymaking across the globe. “Rather than being an individual’s choice, it’s the hard environments that people choose their foods in healthy foods being priced out of reach, and especially out of reach of the poor, and unhealthy foods being marketed aggressively, together with perhaps not having a safe play area for children, that are leading to weight gain,” says Ezzati. Obesity is an underlying cause of many diseases later in life, including heart disease, stroke, diabetes and some cancers. But Ezzati says it also has a big impact in childhood. “It's associated with a stigma, so psycho-social consequences for the children. There is some evidence that it actually affects the educational outcome for the children.”

    Major health challenge

    The study also looked at the number of underweight children, which still represents a major health challenge in the poorest parts of the world. India had the highest prevalence of moderately and severely underweight young people across the four decades. “We really need to deal with the two issues at the same time. So we can’t wait to deal with underweight, and then worry about overweight and obesity. The transition happens really fast and they are all different forms of malnutrition,” says Ezzati. Authors of the report are calling for policymakers to find ways to make healthy, nutritious food more available at home and school, especially in poorer families and communities, alongside higher taxes on unhealthy foods.

    https://www.voanews.com/a/world-heal...c/4065200.html
    Last edited by waltky; 10-14-2017 at 09:38 AM.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by exploited View Post
    In my personal life, I do a bit of volunteering. One of the programs I volunteer with is aimed at public schools. The goal is to convince public schools and districts to take on a micro-farming program, and dedicate adequate resources to it. It can be quite difficult, as people don't really understand the benefits, but every time we get this program established in a new school, six months later, the parents and the teachers and the kids are amazed at the difference in behaviour, diets and attitudes towards food. A couple of schools in the program are even working with one another to specialize in crops, which they trade with one another, so that they can grow more and offset their food costs even more.

    In a nut shell, this is the program: every school buys and builds a greenhouse, and creates a community garden. This garden is used to provide fresh vegetables all year round. The students are directly responsible for planting, maintaining and caring for the plants. Each grade is typically responsible for various aspects of the garden, with the responsibilities becoming more demanding and skill-intensive the older they get. For instance, when it comes to harvest time, the little ones will go out and pick the vegetables. Whereas the older grades will be researching nutritional requirements, mixing up organic additives, setting temperatures, and fixing equipment, all year round. People who are interested more in cooking than in farming are put into special groups which make meals out of the produce, and work with the school to develop nutritious meal plans. To keep things interesting, and make the students well-rounded, students are shifted among various responsibilities throughout the year.

    The impact has been incredible. Kids who had trouble paying attention are doing much better, because they are getting real food with the nutrients they need, rather than processed junk that is high in sodium and sugar and everything else. Kids with weight problems are seeing a drastic decrease, because they are being taught how to make healthy food that actually tastes good. Even kids who are violent and disruptive see some benefit - not only because they weren't getting what they need nutritionally at home, but because it is a socialization process, and it requires alot of hard work and physical activity - this tends to make kids behave better because they aren't simply cooped up in a classroom, but instead are being active without any sense of competition.

    There are other benefits as well - this teaches work ethic and a sense of responsibility and community. Even the most skeptical kid doesn't like it when the plants they are responsible for die. Obviously there are always going to be kids who get no benefit out of this whatsoever, but that is true of school in general, and they are the exception rather than the rule.

    This concept needs to be implemented nation-wide, in my opinion. We could even fund it through donations - it really doesn't cost that much once you have the greenhouses built. And the impact would be much larger than simply providing cheap produce to kids. Educational outcomes will improve, which makes them more competitive for the workplace. Doing better economically will reduce crime and violence. And teaching people to eat vegetables will reduce their meat consumption, which will decrease heart attacks, address climate change, and more. It is a small change that would have broad effects.
    It all sounds great until you say it will "address climate change, and more." Does everything have to be political?

  3. #13
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    Red face

    Slimming down the Hispanic community...

    Community Experiment to Reduce Obesity Among Latinos Promotes Healthier Habits
    October 31, 2017 — The luncheon special has brought a crowd into El Puente de Oro, a Salvadoran restaurant in Langley Park, Maryland. Owner and chef, Ciro Castro, has put together a meal with a large plate of chicken, beans and rice, salad, and a bottle of water. “The plate that costs $10, for them costs only $5,” he says.
    The meal deal is not only saving his customers money, it's encouraging them do what they usually don't - drink water. “When they are over here eating, they ask for juice or soda, or any other stuff - no water,” Castro says. “I ask the waiters to offer water, even if they have a beer or any other soda or other drink, they can sometimes get a sip of water.” Castro is pleased to be part of a positive change in his customers’ eating habits. El Puente de Oro is one of five restaurants in this largely Latino suburb that joined a pilot program called the Water Up Project. Its goal is to get the community to drink more water and reduce their consumption of sugary beverages.

    Neighbors and Friends

    The campaign depends on volunteers, like local leader Brenda Barrios, who's been explaining the program to neighbors and restaurant owners. “It’s not like convincing (the business’ owners), it’s more like informing,” she explains. "It’s more like, you know why we need to change these menus. Can you, please help your families because at the end we are a big family, a big Latino family. We want to be healthy.” Cindy Aguiler is one of her neighbors who have become supporters of the campaign. “I like the idea and very excited about the Water Up Project because it promotes water. One of the simple, healthy and cheap things is water.” She’s now drinking more water, and helping her five children develop this healthy habit by not buying soda drinks at home. “I buy juices. It’s maybe on the weekends, but try to make them drink a lot of water.”

    Make it Visible, Make it Accessible

    Uri Colon-Ramos, assistant professor of global heath at Milken Institute of Public Health in George Washington University, is co-principal investigator of the Water Up Project. She says the question was how to promote drinking water instead of sugary drinks. “One of the things we noticed right away that you go to these businesses, to the restaurants and you sit down and they don’t offer you water to drink,” she says. “You go here in DC and elsewhere, you sit down and this is the first thing they bring you, or there is a place where you can just grab water for free. That’s a big barrier because people would come thirsty, they would say, well give me a beer or horchata or tamarind or something really sugary. And they don’t drink water because they don’t have access there, and even if they ask for water, they would bring you a bottle of water that costs more than sugary drinks.”

    And, she says, ads target Latinos encouraging them to consume more sugary drinks. “Also in their home countries, they are targeted as well, and the globalization is very real. They’re used to drinking or seeing the promotion of soft drinks as well. They come here to the U.S. and they have more access to these drinks.”

    The commercials downplay the serious health risks linked to sugary drinks.

    “Sugary drinks are the number one risk factor for diabetes that we don’t need to have in in our diet,” the researcher explains. “There is no reason why we need the calories that are coming from sugary drinks. At least other foods provide other kinds of nutrients. These are nutrient poor type of food that contributes nothing but calories. And those calories come all in the form of sugar.” The four-month long Water Up project started a few months ago, and researchers are now evaluating the results and feedback, hoping to make it more impactful and expand it to more neighborhoods. They hope this pilot project will inspire other communities around the United States and the world to think about what they drink and choose more water.

    https://www.voanews.com/a/community-...r/4093406.html

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    Kacper (10-31-2017)

  5. #14
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    Require a water fountain in all new home construction.

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    waltky (10-31-2017)

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