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Thread: Music Obituaries

  1. #11
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    waltky's Avatar Senior Member
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    Original Disney Mouseketeer Tracey Dies at 74...


    Original Disney Mouseketeer Tracey Dies at 74
    January 12, 2018 Doreen Tracey, a former child star who played one of the original cute-as-a-button Mouseketeers on The Mickey Mouse Club in the 1950s, has died, according to Disney publicist Howard Green. She was 74.
    Tracey died of pneumonia Wednesday at a hospital in Thousand Oaks, Calif., following a two-year battle with cancer. Tracey maintained ties to Disney and show business throughout her life, appearing in the film Westward Ho the Wagons! and touring with the Mouseketeers. She later served as a publicist to musician Frank Zappa and worked at Warner Bros. It was the pig-tailed Tracey and her talented co-stars including Annette Funicello who appeared on television in black hats with ears following the anthem "M-I-C, K-E-Y, M-O-U-S-E ...'' on ABC's The Mickey Mouse Club.


    Millions of kids raced home from school to watch in wonder as the bouncy Mouseketeers announced themselves at the top of the show. The Mickey Mouse Club was the brainchild of Walt Disney during the flowering of his company's fortunes in the mid-1950s. To help finance the Disneyland park, he agreed to supply ABC with TV shows. One was designed for children in the pre-dinner hour. The hourlong show proved a sensation with its Oct. 3, 1955, debut. It flourished for two seasons, then was reduced to a half-hour for two more. Tracey stayed for its four-year run.



    Former "Mickey Mouse Club" Mouseketeer Doreen Tracey poses near Stage One on The Walt Disney Studios lot after its rededication as the "Annette Funicello Stage" in honor of the late Mouseketeer in Burbank, Calif., June 24, 2013. Stage One was the home of the original "Mickey Mouse Club" TV series.



    The black-and-white series was syndicated in 1962-65. The 1990s version of The Mickey Mouse Club launched the careers of singers Justin Timberlake, Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera, and actors Keri Russell and Ryan Gosling. Born in London on April 3, 1943, to parents who worked in vaudeville, Tracey arrived in the United States when she was 4 and learned to sing and dance. She nabbed a spot on The Mickey Mouse Club when she was 12. Lorraine Santoli, a former executive at Disney who wrote The Official Mickey Mouse Club Book, said Tracey remained close to her Disney roots, maintaining longtime friendships with her fellow Mouseketeers.


    Tracey strained her relationship with Disney by posing for a men's magazine in 1976 with nothing on except her mouse ears and later wearing nothing but an open trench coat in front of Disney Studios. Still, she often appeared at Mickey Mouse Club reunion shows at Disneyland and at Disney conventions, last celebrating the show's 60th anniversary in 2015. Tracey is survived by her son, Bradley, and two grandchildren, Gavin, 9, and Autumn, 12.


    https://www.voanews.com/a/original-m...r/4206110.html

  2. #12
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    rcfieldz's Avatar Senior Member
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    It's too early in the morning for this...

  3. #13
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    waltky's Avatar Senior Member
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    Grazin' in the Grass trumpeter passes on...

    Hugh Masekela, South African Jazz Master And International Chart-Topper, Dies At 78
    January 23, 2018 - Hugh Masekela, the legendary South African jazz musician who scored an unlikely No. 1 hit on the Billboard chart with his song "Grazing in the Grass" and who collaborated with artists ranging from Harry Belafonte to Paul Simon, has died at 78 after a protracted battle with prostate cancer, his family announced Tuesday.
    "[Our] hearts beat with profound loss," the Masekela family said in a statement. "Hugh's global and activist contribution to and participation in the areas of music, theatre, and the arts in general is contained in the minds and memory of millions across 6 continents." Over his career, Masekela collaborated with an astonishing array of musicians, including Harry Belafonte, Herb Alpert, Bob Marley, Fela Kuti, Paul Simon and his ex-wife, Miriam Makeba. For almost 30 years, "Bra Hugh," as he was fondly known, was exiled from his native country. And almost despite himself as he struggled for decades with copious drug and alcohol abuse Masekela became a leading international voice against apartheid. The trumpeter, composer, flugelhorn player, bandleader, singer and political activist was born in the mining town of Witbank, South Africa, on April 4, 1939. Growing up, he lived largely with his grandmother, who ran a shebeen an illicit bar for black and colored South Africans in her house. (Until 1961, it was illegal for nonwhites in South Africa to consume alcohol.)

    Masekela heard township bands and the music of the migrant laborers who would gather to dance and sing in the shebeen on weekends. One of his uncles shared 78s of jazz musicians like Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington and Glenn Miller. Those two forces, the music and the booze, did much to shape Masekela's life. He began drinking at age 13. He was given his first trumpet at age 14 by an anti-apartheid crusader, the Rev. Trevor Huddleston, who was also the superintendent of a boarding school that Masekela attended. "I was always in trouble with the authorities in school," Masekela told NPR in 2004. He had been inspired by the Kirk Douglas film Young Man with a Horn. Huddleston, hoping to steer him away from delinquency, asked what it was that would make Masekela happy. "I said, 'Father, if you can get me a trumpet I won't bother anybody anymore.' "


    South African musician Hugh Masekela, performs in New Delhi in 2004.

    Masekela soon became part of the Huddleston Jazz Band. And the priest managed to get one of the world's most famous musicians to send young Hugh a new instrument, as Masekela told NPR in 2004. "Three years later," Masekela recalled, "[Huddleston] was deported and came through the United States on his way to England and met Louis Armstrong and told him about the band. And Louis Armstrong sent us a trumpet." By the mid-1950s, he had joined Alfred Herbert's African Jazz Revue in Johannesburg; within just a few years, Masekela was good enough to co-found a landmark South African band, The Jazz Epistles, which also featured another landmark South African artist, the pianist and composer Abdullah Ibrahim. They recorded the first modern jazz record in South Africa featuring an all-black band. Within months of The Jazz Epistles' creation, South African police opened fire on thousands of protesters and 69 people were killed in the infamous Sharpeville Massacre of 1960. The apartheid government declared a state of emergency, and The Jazz Epistles couldn't play together. Meanwhile, Masekela had learned that he was being targeted for his anti-apartheid activities, and he had made friends with a talented singer named Miriam Makeba, who had already fled the country for New York.

    Masekela, now 21 years old, was scrambling to secure a passport and papers to study music abroad. And his friendship with Makeba proved crucial, as he told NPR's Tell Me More in 2013. She and the singer and activist Harry Belafonte became his patrons and mentors. Masekela had originally planned to head to England to study at the Guildhall School of Music & Drama. But once he was there, Makeba encouraged him to head to New York. "We'd always dreamt of coming to the States, but she came a year earlier and blew the States away," he told NPR. "So she said, 'Hey, you got to come, forget about London, this is the place to be.' And she was on a first-name basis with everybody. Then she and Harry Belafonte gave me a scholarship to Manhattan School of Music. I also had to work part time in Harry Belafonte's music publishing, because they ain't going to give you no money," Masekela said.

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  4. #14
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    Temptations singer Dennis Edwards dies aged 74...

    Temptations singer Dennis Edwards dies aged 74
    February 2, 2018 - Dennis Edwards, who performed as lead singer for the Motown group the Temptations, has died at aged 74.
    He died in Chicago, his family told CBS News. They did not disclose the cause of death. Edwards joined the Temptations in 1968 and had a number of hits including two Grammy award-winning songs, Papa Was a Rollin' Stone and Cloud Nine. He pursued a solo career in the 1980s, and was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1989. Edwards, who would have turned 75 on Saturday, had solo hits such as Don't Look Any Further and Coolin' Out.


    Dennis Edwards was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1989

    Fans have paid their respects on social media, and civil rights activist Jesse Jackson described Edwards as "so talented". The Temptations was one of the leading male vocal groups of the 1960s and early 1970s, and helped define the signature Motown sound. The group went through various line-ups and tackled a wide range of musical styles.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-42924559

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