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Thread: Healthy Italian Peasant Food

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    Healthy Italian Peasant Food

    My wife and I love italian peasant food and eat it often.

    Take fresh broccoli blanche it, put it aside let it cool. Boil the water for penne rigatta or rotini. While the waters boiling put olive oil in a sautee pan, just cover the bottom add garlic to taste. To us there is never enough garlic, I use a head and half. Sautee the garlic till its just turning golden brown and toss in the broccoli take it off the eat mix it well add some salt pepper and crushed red pepper if you like it. Mix it with whole grain pasta grate pamesan or locatelli.

    I like it better with spinach or broccoli raab my wife likes garlic. There is virtually no cholesterol or fat other than the good fat from Olive oil

    You can add variations I do sautee eggplant and do the same thing and zucchini etc. Whatever you use its all good for you.

    Another variation that I use take hot italian sausage slice the skin open sautee till cooked an browned separating it and mix that with the pasta and whatever veggie you use. I LOVE THAT
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    Sounds great, Common. I've never had Italian peasant food but it sounds like something I'd enjoy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tricia View Post
    Sounds great, Common. I've never had Italian peasant food but it sounds like something I'd enjoy.
    Theres alot more italian peasant food that many wouldnt eat. When I was a kid I worked in a big city farm market and I was fortunate to get alot of vegetables for free and my grandmother would make this for us.

    I like the real peasant food, tripe, soffrita, pasta ceci etc
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    Great stuff!
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    Check out the blog.


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    The type of healthy Italian peasant food could depend on the time-period and location. Due to the climate, the foods in Northern Italy would likely be somewhat different than the foods in southern Italy. Inner city peasants vs. rural peasants could make a difference too.

    My grandparents were born in Sicily in the late 1800s and basically all they had was food from their gardens and a few chickens. Families were big so they didn't have a lot of eggs. And even in the early 1900s things were still much the same. My father told me that meat was a delicacy that you were lucky to have a few times per year. If a chicken stopped laying eggs, the chicken became the meal. There were no ovens so most likely it was boiled but it was a big treat for the family. Not sure if there were any special recipes or even olive oil. There were orange groves, olive groves and wheat fields in the general area but I'm not sure to what extent they had access to those items as they lived in a small town with no stores.

    Anyway, it was a healthy way of eating and I am pretty much back to that. I'm a vegan who eats natural whole foods. No oils and no meats, dairy or eggs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trumpster View Post
    The type of healthy Italian peasant food could depend on the time-period and location. Due to the climate, the foods in Northern Italy would likely be somewhat different than the foods in southern Italy. Inner city peasants vs. rural peasants could make a difference too.

    My grandparents were born in Sicily in the late 1800s and basically all they had was food from their gardens and a few chickens. Families were big so they didn't have a lot of eggs. And even in the early 1900s things were still much the same. My father told me that meat was a delicacy that you were lucky to have a few times per year. If a chicken stopped laying eggs, the chicken became the meal. There were no ovens so most likely it was boiled but it was a big treat for the family. Not sure if there were any special recipes or even olive oil. There were orange groves, olive groves and wheat fields in the general area but I'm not sure to what extent they had access to those items as they lived in a small town with no stores.

    Anyway, it was a healthy way of eating and I am pretty much back to that. I'm a vegan who eats natural whole foods. No oils and no meats, dairy or eggs.
    My mother was sicilian, you forgot goats, goats were a big part of survival for peasant sicilians. The milk, the cheese and if the goat dried up the meat.

    The peasant food I was refering to was mostly sicilian, they ate alot of beans lentils, chic peas, they ate parts of the cow that are discarded today, heart, lungs, intestines, stomach lining. They had a way of making all that tender and taste damn good too.

    Escarole and beans with scraps of shredded meat was a delicacy. I grew up eating that in good ole USA. I used to laugh when black kids my friends came over, they would look stunned and wrinkle their nose and say im not hungry I just ate

    Ill never forget the first time I saw Casu Marzu aka Maggot Cheese, it was originally sardinian but 1800s up till early 1900s alot of regions in italy made it.

    I drew the line with Casu Marzu aint nuttin happening there ugh.
    "The further a society drifts from the truth, the more it will hate those who speak it"



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    Quote Originally Posted by Common View Post
    My mother was sicilian, you forgot goats, goats were a big part of survival for peasant sicilians. The milk, the cheese and if the goat dried up the meat. The peasant food I was refering to was mostly sicilian, they ate alot of beans lentils, chic peas, they ate parts of the cow that are discarded today, heart, lungs, intestines, stomach lining. They had a way of making all that tender and taste damn good too.

    Escarole and beans with scraps of shredded meat was a delicacy. I grew up eating that in good ole USA. I used to laugh when black kids my friends came over, they would look stunned and wrinkle their nose and say im not hungry I just ate

    Ill never forget the first time I saw Casu Marzu aka Maggot Cheese, it was originally sardinian but 1800s up till early 1900s alot of regions in italy made it.

    I drew the line with Casu Marzu aint nuttin happening there ugh.

    Yes, my father mentioned goats but I think he said that not every family had a goat. And I don't think his family had one because you would have to have a lot of room for the goat to roam. All the homes were attached like a long row house. So the back yard space was limited. Certainly not enough room for a cow either; a cow would need at least one acre fence in. This was basically a one industry town where the men worked in a sulfur mine and I don't think the residents owned their homes. So they most likely didn't have unlimited use of the land.

    I wish I had asked more questions while my parents were still living.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trumpster View Post
    Yes, my father mentioned goats but I think he said that not every family had a goat. And I don't think his family had one because you would have to have a lot of room for the goat to roam. All the homes were attached like a long row house. So the back yard space was limited. Certainly not enough room for a cow either; a cow would need at least one acre fence in. This was basically a one industry town where the men worked in a sulfur mine and I don't think the residents owned their homes. So they most likely didn't have unlimited use of the land. I wish I had asked more questions while my parents were still living.

    Ok you parents lived in a different environment than mine, my parents met and married in the USA they were born in different parts of italy, my father in Foggia near the spur and my mother in Sicily Both are in southern italy, the province of foggia being near the spur of the boot.
    My fathers father was a tailor, and my mothers father was a butcher in Palermo, neither worked their trades in the USA
    Last edited by Common; 06-04-2017 at 05:52 AM.
    "The further a society drifts from the truth, the more it will hate those who speak it"



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