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Thread: Alzheimer's & dementia

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    waltky's Avatar Senior Member
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    Lightbulb Alzheimer's & dementia

    New study shows way to detect Alzheimer's earlier...

    Alzheimer's detected decades before symptoms
    5 November 2012 - Researchers have found some of the earliest signs of Alzheimer's disease, more than two decades before the first symptoms usually appear.
    Treating the disease early is thought to be vital to prevent damage to memory and thinking. A study, published in the Lancet Neurology, found differences in the brains of an extended Colombian family predisposed to develop an early form of Alzheimer's. Experts said the US study may give doctors more time to treat people. Alzheimer's disease starts long before anyone would notice; previous studies have shown an effect on the brain 10-15 years before symptoms.


    The shrunken brain of an Alzheimer's patient compared with a healthy one

    It is only after enough brain cells have died that the signs of dementia begin to appear - some regions of the brain will have lost up to 20% of their brain cells before the disease becomes noticeable. However, doctors fear so much of the brain will have degenerated by this time that it will be too late to treat patients. The failure of recent trials to prevent further cognitive decline in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease has been partly put down to timing.

    Early start

    A team at the Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Arizona looked at a group of patients in Colombia who have familial Alzheimer's. A genetic mutation means they nearly always get the disease in their 40s. Alzheimer's normally becomes apparent after the age of 75. Brain scans of 20 people with the mutation, aged between 18 and 26, already showed differences compared with those from 24 people who were not destined to develop early Alzheimer's. The fluid which bathes the brain and spinal cord also had higher levels of a protein called beta-amyloid.

    The researchers said differences could be detected "more than two decades before" symptoms would appear in these high-risk patients. Dr Eric Reiman, one of the scientists involved, said: "These findings suggest that brain changes begin many years before the clinical onset of Alzheimer's disease. "They raise new questions about the earliest brain changes involved in the predisposition to Alzheimer's and the extent to which they could be targeted by future prevention therapies."

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    GrumpyDog's Avatar Senior Member
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    Thanks for posting. Good information for the conservative posters on the forum.

    Got anything on Romneysia?

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    Quote Originally Posted by GrumpyDog View Post
    Thanks for posting. Good information for the conservative posters on the forum.

    Got anything on Romneysia?
    Please keep to the topic

    http://thepoliticalforums.com/thread...litical-Forums


    Other Discussions are for more serious discussion and stricter moderation. The rules apply but, on the positive side, we will also require that all posts make a contribution be it information, question or argumentation, and on the negative side we will not allow trolling, inflammatory remarks, personal attacks, or off-topic comments.
    my junk is ugly

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    Trumpster (01-05-2017)

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    I kind of laughed when I saw this since I have found myself frequently arguing the many benefits of hormonal contraception, which now also apparently could include some protection against Alzheimer's and other conditions which affect cognitive functioning:

    Longer Use of Hormonal Contraception During Midlife Predicts Better Cognitive Function Later

    ScienceDaily (Nov. 7, 2012) — Premenopausal use of hormonal contraceptives may improve the cognitive abilities of women in midlife and for years afterward. This finding may have implications for prevention of declining cognitive function that occurs with advancing age and in diseases such as Alzheimer's. The beneficial effects of hormones increase the longer a woman uses them, as described in a study published in Journal of Women's Health, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...1107122602.htm

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    I have heard there is research suggesting NOT eating meat contributes to Alzheimer's. It would be (literally) ironic if strict vegetarianism increased one's chances for the disease (no snark intended). I mean eating a lot of vegetables is definitely very healthy overall. Maybe deep down in ways we don't yet understand, man/woman is meant to consume some meat.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trinnity View Post
    I have heard there is research suggesting NOT eating meat contributes to Alzheimer's. It would be (literally) ironic if strict vegetarianism increased one's chances for the disease (no snark intended). I mean eating a lot of vegetables is definitely very healthy overall. Maybe deep down in ways we don't yet understand, man/woman is meant to consume some meat.

    Right. You need high quality Omega 3s to protect the CPU. You aren't getting that from non-meat sources.

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    We're carnivores for a reason.
    Please note: verbage enclosed by < > indicates sarcasm

    "There's class war alright. But it's my class that's making the war. And we're winning it." - Warren Buffet

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    If your mom or dad had it, most likely you will some won't. Some people say this when their parents have mild strokes, it's not the same. I have known 50 year olds that came down with stage 1. The first signs are when you are talking to someone they after 5 to 10 minutes say the same thing over. It doesn't run in my family but does in my spouses family. Listen and watch for the signs. I called it way before the Dr. on his mom. One of his younger brothers already shows the signs. I worked with these people for a long time. The best thing I have found is to work the mind and try to prolong it. Until we can find a cure.

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    Lightbulb

    Worsening depression 'link to dementia'...

    Worsening depression 'may predict dementia risk'
    Sat, 30 Apr 2016 - Increasing symptoms of depression in older age could indicate early signs of dementia, say scientists.
    Other patterns of symptoms, such as chronic depression, appear not to be linked, a study found. Dutch researchers looked at different ways depression in older adults progressed over time and how this related to any risk. They concluded worsening depression may signal the condition is taking hold. The research, published in The Lancet Psychiatry, followed more than 3,000 adults aged 55 and over living in the Netherlands. All had depression but no symptoms of dementia at the start of the study.


    A link between depression and dementia has been known for some time

    Dr M Arfan Ikram of the Erasmus University Medical Center in Rotterdam said depressive symptoms that gradually increase over time appear to be a better predictor of dementia later in life than other paths of depression. "There are a number of potential explanations, including that depression and dementia may both be symptoms of a common underlying cause, or that increasing depressive symptoms are on the starting end of a dementia continuum in older adults," he said. Only the group whose symptoms of depression increased over time were found to be at increased risk of dementia - about one in five of people (55 out of 255) in this group developed dementia. Others who had symptoms that waxed and waned or stayed the same were not at increased risk. For example, in those who experienced low but stable levels of depression, around 10% went on to develop dementia.

    Prevention strategies?

    The exact nature of depression on dementia risk remains unknown. They often occur together, but the Dutch study is among the first to look at different patterns of depression symptoms. Dr Simone Reppermund from the Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing at the University of New South Wales, Sydney, said more studies were needed to understand the link. "A focus on lifestyle factors such as physical activity and social networks, and biological risk factors such as vascular disease, neuroinflammation, high concentrations of stress hormones, and neuropathological changes, might bring new treatment and prevention strategies a step closer," she wrote in a linked editorial in the journal. Depression varies greatly from one person to another. Some experience depressive symptoms only briefly, others have remitting and relapsing depression and some people are depressed all the time.

    Dr Simon Ridley, director of research at Alzheimer's Research UK, said anyone concerned about either condition should seek help. "The findings suggest that low levels of depression or fluctuating symptoms may not affect dementia risk but that a worsening of symptoms in the over-55s may be an early indicator of diseases like Alzheimer's," he said. "It's important to remember that only a relatively small number of people experiencing symptoms of depression went on to develop dementia during this 11-year study, but anyone concerned about either condition should talk to their GP."

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-36170259

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    Angry

    Granny says, "Dat's right - is prob'ly from breathin' in all dem exhaust fumes...

    Dementia rates 'higher near busy roads'
    Thu, 05 Jan 2017 - People who live near major roads have higher rates of dementia, research suggests.
    People who live near major roads have higher rates of dementia, research published in the Lancet suggests. About 10% of dementia cases in people living within 50m of a major road could be down to traffic, the study suggests. The researchers, who followed nearly 2m people in Canada over 11 years, say air pollution or noisy traffic could be contributing to the brain's decline. Dementia experts in the UK said the findings needed further investigation but were "certainly plausible". Nearly 50 million people around the world have dementia. However, the causes of the disease, that robs people of their memories and brain power, are not understood.


    Car exhaust pipes

    Population growth

    The study in the Lancet followed nearly two million people in the Canadian province of Ontario, between 2001 and 2012. There were 243,611 cases of dementia diagnosed during that time, but the risk was greatest in those living closest to major roads. Compared with those living 300m away from a major road the risk was:

    * 7% higher within 50m
    * 4% higher between 50-100m
    * 2% higher between 101-200m

    The analysis suggests 7-11% of dementia cases within 50m of a major road could be caused by traffic.

    Dr Hong Chen, from Public Health Ontario and one of the report authors, said: "Increasing population growth and urbanisation have placed many people close to heavy traffic, and with widespread exposure to traffic and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from near-road exposure could pose a large public health burden. "More research to understand this link is needed, particularly into the effects of different aspects of traffic, such as air pollutants and noise." The researchers suggest noise, ultrafine particles, nitrogen oxides and particles from tyre-wear may be involved. However, the study looks only at where people diagnosed with dementia live. It cannot prove that the roads are causing the disease.

    'Provocative'

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