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Thread: God sides with GOP on Climate Change

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    spunkloaf's Avatar Senior Member
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    God sides with GOP on Climate Change

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/21/us...21climate.html
    This article is from 2010, but it is still largely relevant.
    “Carbon regulation, cap and trade, it’s all just a money-control avenue,” Ms. Khuri added. “Some people say I’m extreme, but they said the John Birch Society was extreme, too.”
    ^^This is one of my favorite quotes.

    Lisa Deaton, a small-business owner in Columbus, Ind., who started We the People Indiana, a Tea Party affiliate, is supporting Mr. Young in part because of his stand against climate change legislation.
    “They’re trying to use global warming against the people,” Ms. Deaton said. “It takes away our liberty.”
    “Being a strong Christian,” she added, “I cannot help but believe the Lord placed a lot of minerals in our country and it’s not there to destroy us.”
    This is how religion is dumbing-down Americans.


    I can maybe, MAYBE understand religion alone. But for people to use it to justify their political motives? Puh-lease.
    Faith can move mountains, but don't forget to bring your shovel.

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    Hoosier8's Avatar Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by spunkloaf View Post
    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/21/us...21climate.html
    This article is from 2010, but it is still largely relevant.

    ^^This is one of my favorite quotes.



    This is how religion is dumbing-down Americans.


    I can maybe, MAYBE understand religion alone. But for people to use it to justify their political motives? Puh-lease.
    The religion of CAGW is certainly dumbing people down. At least you have the Pope on your side.

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    stjames1_53 (07-12-2017)

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    what climate change screamers fail to recognize is the fact that the planet has been going through changes since its creation.
    It's called evolution of the planet.
    With or without God, the planet still changes and will continue to do so until its demise
    I suppose you think oxygen as we know it has been around since the Big Bang.............
    For waltky: http://quakes.globalincidentmap.com/
    "The Nation that makes a great distinction between its scholars and its warriors will have its thinking done by cowards and its fighting done by fools."
    - Thucydides

    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote" B. Franklin
    Igitur qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum

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    waltky's Avatar Senior Member
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    Red face

    Granny fusses at possum when he hangs by his tail from the tree she planted...

    Scientists: Plant More Trees to Combat Climate Change
    October 16, 2017 — Planting forests and other activities that harness the power of nature could play a major role in limiting global warming under the 2015 Paris agreement, an international study showed Monday.
    Natural climate solutions, also including protection of carbon-storing peat lands and better management of soils and grasslands, could account for 37 percent of all actions needed by 2030 under the 195-nation Paris plan, it said. Combined, the suggested "regreening of the planet" would be equivalent to halting all burning of oil worldwide, it said. "Better stewardship of the land could have a bigger role in fighting climate change than previously thought," the international team of scientists said of findings published in the U.S. journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


    The estimates for nature's potential, led by planting forests, were up to 30 percent higher than those envisaged by a U.N. panel of climate scientists in a 2014 report, it said. Trees soak up heat-trapping carbon dioxide as they grow and release it when they burn or rot. That makes forests, from the Amazon to Siberia, vast natural stores of greenhouse gases. Overall, better management of nature could avert 11.3 billion tons of carbon dioxide emissions a year by 2030, the study said, equivalent to China's current carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel use.



    A caretaker of the Zika Forest near Entebbe, Uganda, poses under the trees



    The Paris climate agreement, weakened by U.S. President Donald Trump's decision in June to pull out, seeks to limit a rise in global temperature to "well below" two degrees Celsius (3.6 Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial times. Current government pledges to cut emissions are too weak to achieve the 2C goal, meant to avert more droughts, more powerful storms, downpours and heat waves. "Fortunately, this research shows we have a huge opportunity to reshape our food and land use systems," Paul Polman, CEO of Unilever, said in a statement of Monday's findings.


    Climate change could jeopardize production of crops such as corn, wheat, rice and soy even as a rising global population will raise demand, he said. The study said that some of the measures would cost $10 a ton or less to avert a ton of carbon dioxide, with others up to $100 a ton to qualify as "cost-effective" by 2030. "If we are serious about climate change, then we are going to have to get serious about investing in nature," said Mark Tercek, chief executive officer of The Nature Conservancy, which led the study.


    https://www.voanews.com/a/scientists...e/4073431.html

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    Question

    Shorter winter points toward climate change...

    Winter's Arrival, Departure Dates Reflect Changing Climate, Scientists Say
    October 28, 2017 | WASHINGTON — Winter is coming ... later. And it's leaving ever earlier.
    Across the United States, the year's first freeze has been arriving further and further into the calendar, according to more than a century of measurements from weather stations nationwide. Scientists say it is yet another sign of the changing climate, and that it has good and bad consequences for the nation. There could be more fruits and vegetables — and also more allergies and pests. "I'm happy about it," said Karen Duncan of Streator, Illinois. Her flowers are in bloom because she's had no frost this year yet, just as she had none last year at this time, either. On the other hand, she said just last week it was too hot and buggy to go out — in late October, near Chicago.


    Sun rays spill through a gap between the clouds and the White Mountains as the skies begin to clear above Bartlett, N.H., Sept. 22, 2017. The first weekend of autumn in the area was unusually warm — and across the nation, the year's first freeze has been arriving further and further into the calendar.


    The trend of ever later first freezes appears to have started around 1980, according to an analysis by The Associated Press of data from 700 weather stations across the U.S. going back to 1895 compiled by Ken Kunkel, a meteorologist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Centers for Environmental Information. To look for nationwide trends, Kunkel compared the first freeze from each of the 700 stations to the station's average for the 20th century. Some parts of the country experience earlier or later freezes every year, but on average freezes are coming later.

    Average first freeze

    The average first freeze over the last 10 years, from 2007 to 2016, is a week later than the average from 1971 to 1980, which is before Kunkel said the trend became noticeable. This year, about 40 percent of the Lower 48 states had a freeze as of October 23, compared with 65 percent in a normal year, according to Jeff Masters, meteorology director of the private service Weather Underground. Duncan's flowers should be dead by now. According to data from the weather station near her in Ottawa, Illinois, the average first freeze for the 20th century was October 15. The normal from 1981 to 2010 based on NOAA computer simulations was October 19. Since 2010, the average first freeze is on October 26. Last year, the first freeze in Ottawa came on Nov. 12.


    Morning dew covers berries in Bartlett, N.H., Sept. 18, 2017. Despite forecasts for brilliant foliage throughout the Northeast this year, longtime leaf watchers said the leaves this fall were dull and weeks behind schedule in their turn from green to the brilliant hues of autumn.

    Last year was "way off the charts" nationwide, Kunkel said. The average first freeze was two weeks later than the 20th century average, and the last frost of spring was nine days earlier than normal. Overall the United States freeze season of 2016 was more than a month shorter than the freeze season of 1916. It was most extreme in the Pacific Northwest. Oregon's freeze season was 61 days shorter than normal. Global warming has helped push the first frosts later, Kunkel and other scientists said. Also at play, though, are natural short-term changes in air circulation patterns, but they, too, may be influenced by man-made climate change, they said. This shrinking freeze season is what climate scientists have long predicted, said University of Oklahoma meteorology professor Jason Furtado.

    Some plants suffer

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    Question

    Cooler temps from climate change?...

    Climate change dials down Atlantic Ocean heating system
    11 Apr.`18 - A significant shift in the system of ocean currents that helps keep parts of Europe warm could send temperatures in the UK lower, scientists have found.
    They say the Atlantic Ocean circulation system is weaker now than it has been for more than 1,000 years - and has changed significantly in the past 150. The study, in the journal Nature, says it may be a response to increased melting ice and is likely to continue. Researchers say that could have an impact on Atlantic ecosystems. Scientists involved in the Atlas project - the largest study of deep Atlantic ecosystems ever undertaken - say the impact will not be of the order played out in the 2004 Hollywood blockbuster The Day After Tomorrow. But they say changes to the conveyor-belt-like system - also known as the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (Amoc) - could cool the North Atlantic and north-west Europe and transform some deep-ocean ecosystems.


    The circulation system plays a "significant role" in regulating the Earth's climate by distributing heat around the globe.

    That could also affect temperature-sensitive species like coral, and even Atlantic cod. Scientists believe the pattern is a response to fresh water from melting ice sheets being added to surface ocean water, meaning those surface waters "can't get very dense and sink". "That puts a spanner in this whole system," lead researcher Dr David Thornalley, from University College London, explained. The concept of this system "shutting down" was featured in The Day After Tomorrow. "Obviously that was a sensationalised version," said Dr Thornally. "But much of the underlying science was correct, and there would be significant changes to climate it if did undergo a catastrophic collapse - although the film made those effects much more catastrophic, and happening much more quickly - than would actually be the case."

    Nonetheless, a change to the system could cool the North Atlantic and north-west Europe and transform some deep-ocean ecosystems. That is why its measurement has been a key part of the Atlas project. Scientists say understanding what is happening to Amoc will help them make much more accurate forecasts of our future climate. Prof Murray Roberts, who co-ordinates the Atlas project at the University of Edinburgh, told BBC News: "The changes we're seeing now in deep Atlantic currents could have massive effects on ocean ecosystems. "The deep Atlantic contains some of the world's oldest and most spectacular cold-water coral reef and deep-sea sponge grounds. "These delicate ecosystems rely on ocean currents to supply their food and disperse their offspring. Ocean currents are like highways spreading larvae throughout the ocean and we know these ecosystems have been really sensitive to past changes in the Earth's climate."


    The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (Amoc) was the basis of the a 2004 science fiction blockbuster

    To measure how the system has shifted over long timescales, researchers collected long cores of sediment from the sea floor. The sediment was laid down by past ocean currents, so the size of the sediment grains in different layers provided a measure of the current's strength over time. The results were also backed up by another study published in the same issue of Nature, led by researchers from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research in Germany. This work looked at climate model data to confirm that sea-surface temperature patterns can be used as an indicator of Amoc's strength and revealing that it has been weakening even more rapidly since 1950 in response to recent global warming. The scientists want to continue to study patterns in this crucial temperature-regulating system, to understand whether as ice sheets continue to melt, this could drive further slowdown - or even a shutdown of a system that regulates our climate.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-43713719

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