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Thread: Pneumonia & other respiratory ailments

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    Exclamation Pneumonia & other respiratory ailments

    Pneumonia kills more children than any other disease in the world...

    UN Calls for Action on Pneumonia in Children
    November 11, 2012 — The United Nations is observing World Pneumonia Day on November 12 by calling on country leaders to spring into action to reduce child deaths from pneumonia. U.N. and other health agencies say the world has the means to save hundreds of thousands of children’s lives from this preventable disease.
    Pneumonia kills more children than any other disease in the world. The U.N. Children’s Fund reports every 25 seconds a child dies from pneumonia. It kills 3,400 children a day or 1.3 million a year. By this calculation, pneumonia accounts for 18 percent of the 6.9 million child deaths a year. As with many other diseases, the main victims are the world’s poorest, most marginalized children. They are the ones who cannot afford the treatments and vaccines that could save their lives. UNICEF spokeswoman, Marixie Mercado, says 90 percent of all child deaths from pneumonia occur in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia.

    “But, it is easily preventable and it is easily treatable," she said. "Basically, the evidence shows that if the poorest households had the same basic interventions that are available to the richest households, millions of children would live instead of die, due to a totally preventable disease.” Pneumonia can result from vaccine-preventable diseases such as measles and whooping cough. About 85 percent of the world’s children receive these life-saving vaccines. The poorest do not. UNICEF is calling for universal vaccine coverage so all children, even the poorest, are protected.

    Streptococcus pneumonia and Haemophilus influenza type b are two major causes of bacterial pneumonia. They can be prevented through PCV and Hib vaccines. Most low- income countries have introduced the influenza type b Hib vaccines against pneumonia. But, UNICEF’s Mercado says the introduction of PCV vaccines in low-income countries is proceeding at a slower pace. “The same is true with treatment," she said. "Right now, less than a third of children with pneumonia received antibiotics in developing countries. Just recently, a report by the U.N. Commission on Life Saving Commodities estimated that over 1.5 million children could be saved if amoxicillin - an antibiotic that costs 30 centimes per treatment dose, were more widely available.”

    Children in poorer countries are at higher risk of getting pneumonia, a respiratory disease, than those in richer countries because of indoor air pollution. Low-income households burn wood, dung and coal for cooking or heating, with poorly ventilated fires and stoves. Overcrowded homes also contribute to higher levels of childhood pneumonia. Health experts say a number of preventive measures other than vaccines and antibiotics are effective in staving off pneumonia. These include safe drinking water and improved sanitation, as well as the promotion of practices such as exclusive breastfeeding and use of clean cook stoves to reduce indoor air pollution. They say frequent hand washing with soap and water reduces the incidence of pneumonia by 23 percent. Unfortunately, they note hand washing is not routinely practiced in most developing countries, especially among the poor.

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    Pneumonia is one of the top DRG's for inpatient admissions.
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    Pollen Allergies Projected To Intensify...

    Allergies from Pollen Projected to Intensify with Climate Change
    Fri, Nov 9, 2012 - Spring and summer allergy sufferers might already have noticed a slight increase in days spent sneezing each year.
    And new research suggests that allergies triggered by pollen are set to increase--in both duration and severity--with climate change. The seasonal scourge ragweed has already been expanding its range in North America, thanks in large part to warming temperatures. "Climate change will increase pollen production considerably in the near future," Leonard Bielory, a visiting professor at Rutgers University and lead researcher on the new project, said in a prepared statement. In fact, plant-based allergens are expected to nearly double by the year 2040, according to research presented this week at the annual scientific meeting of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI).

    The researchers are studying plants grown in chambers that mimic conditions (including temperature, precipitation and carbon dioxide levels) similar to those projected by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in coming decades. Bielory's findings suggest that while pollen counts (the average number of pollen particles in a cubic yard of air over the course of a day) in the northeastern U.S. averaged at about 8,455 in 2000, they will surpass 11,412 by 2020 and will top 18,285 by 2040--possibly pushing as high as 21,735. In the past 25 years, for example, ragweed pollen has increased from Texas all the way up to Canada. Not only are the average pollen counts likely to increase dramatically, but the allergy season is also set to start--and reach peak levels--much earlier in the year.

    In 2000, for example, pollen production began around April 15, but in 2020 it is expected to begin around March 27. Peak pollen production (increasing from 1,684 in 2000 to at least 1,844 in 2020) is likely to move from May 2 in 2000 to April 9 in 2020. And the warm season is not simply shifting its dates, but in most of North America, it is expanding by starting earlier and ending later, bringing more pollen for its duration. Allergies are affecting an increasing segment of the population. Although there is currently no cure for seasonal allergies--and many people cope simply by using over-the-counter treatments to reduce symptoms--allergy shots can improve the body's tolerance for the allergen.

    Allergies occur when the body's immune system overreacts to a substance, such as tree pollen, grass, mold, dust mites, animal dander or a food. So shots work by slowly exposing the body to small amounts of the culprit substance. The drawback is that shots generally need to be given over time, and the tolerance generally does not last indefinitely. Bielroy recommends that, "allergy sufferers begin long-term treatment, such as immunotherapy, now" to decrease their reaction to increasing pollen levels to come.

    http://news.yahoo.com/allergies-poll...210200323.html

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    Wearable pneumonia detector...

    Ugandan engineers invent app, ‘smart jacket’ to help diagnose pneumonia
    Mon, Jan 23, 2017 - A team of Ugandan engineers has invented a “smart jacket” that diagnoses pneumonia faster than a doctor, offering hope against a disease which kills more children worldwide than any other.
    The idea came to Olivia Koburongo, 26, after her grandmother fell ill and was moved from hospital to hospital before being properly diagnosed with pneumonia. “It was now too late to save her,” Koburongo said. “It was too hard to keep track of her vitals, of how she’s doing, and that is how I thought of a way to automate the whole process and keep track of her health.” Koburongo took her idea to fellow telecommunications engineering graduate Brian Turyabagye, 24, and together with a team of doctors they came up with the “Mama-Ope” (Mother’s Hope) kit made up of a biomedical smart jacket and a mobile phone app, which does the diagnosis.

    Pneumonia — a severe lung infection — kills up to 24,000 Ugandan children under the age of five per year, many of whom are misdiagnosed as having malaria, according to the UNICEF. A lack of access to laboratory testing and infrastructure in poor communities means health workers often have to rely on simple clinical examinations to make their diagnoses. With the easy-to-use Mama-Ope kit, health workers merely have to slip the jacket onto the child, and its sensors pick up sound patterns from the lungs, temperature and breathing rate. “The processed information is sent to a mobile phone app [via Bluetooth] which analyzes the information in comparison to known data so as to get an estimate of the strength of the disease,” Turyabagye said.


    Telecommunications engineer Olivia Koburongo fits a child with the Mama-Ope kit at the Makerere University of Public Health in Kampala, Uganda

    The jacket, which is still only a prototype, can diagnose pneumonia up to three times faster than a doctor and reduces human error, according to studies done by its inventors. Traditionally doctors use a stethoscope to listen for abnormal crackling or bubbling sounds in the lungs. However, if medics suspect malaria or tuberculosis — which also include respiratory distress — the time lost treating those rather than pneumonia could prove deadly for their patient. “The problem we’re trying to solve is diagnosing pneumonia at an early stage before it gets severe and we’re also trying to solve the problem of not enough manpower in hospitals because currently we have a doctor to patient ratio which is one to 24,000 in the country,” Koburongo said.

    Turyabagye said plans were under way to have the kit piloted in Uganda’s referral hospitals and then trickle down to health centers. “Once you have this information captured on cloud storage, it means a doctor who is not even in the rural area, who is not on the ground, can access the same information from any patient and it helps in making an informed decision,” he said. The team is also working on patenting the kit, which is shortlisted for this year’s Royal Academy of Engineering Africa Prize. “Once it is successful [in Uganda] we hope it is rolled out to other African countries and major parts of the world where pneumonia is killing thousands of children,” Koburongo said. According to UNICEF, most of the 900,000 annual deaths of children under five due to pneumonia occur in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. This is more than other causes of childhood death such as diarrhea, malaria, meningitis or HIV/AIDS.

    http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/worl.../23/2003663661

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    Bush SR. is in icu with pneumonia, mightta been that cold rain at the inauguration, they need a roof over that place!
    My new avatar is both of my cap n ball revolvers.

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    He didn't make the inauguration...

    ... because he was in the hospital...

    ... due to the pneumonia.

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