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Thread: Diabetes advances, research & treatments

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    waltky's Avatar Senior Member
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    Lightbulb Diabetes advances, research & treatments

    Parents overlook diabetes signs...

    Parents 'unaware of type 1 diabetes symptoms'
    13 November 2012 - Type 1 diabetes is treated with daily insulin doses
    About 90% of parents are unaware of the four key symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children, a survey suggests. The poll of 1,170 parents, for Diabetes UK, suggests many cases go undetected until the child becomes seriously ill. In the BBC News website Scrubbing Up column, its chief executive says about 2,000 under-18s are diagnosed with the condition in the UK each year. The main signs are tiredness, needing the toilet more, excessive thirst and weight loss.

    An estimated 3.7 million people in the UK have diabetes. Type 1 affects about 10% of them. It appears before the age of 40, usually in childhood. It is treated by daily insulin doses - taken either by injections or via an insulin pump - a healthy diet and regular physical activity Type 2 develops when the body can still make some insulin, but not enough, or when the insulin that is produced does not work properly.

    'Obvious'

    Most of the parents surveyed knew thirstiness and tiredness were warning signs. But only 38% knew passing urine frequently was an indication of type 1 diabetes, while even fewer - 28% - linked weight loss with the condition. The charity says this is one reason why a quarter of children with type 1 diabetes are only diagnosed once they are already seriously ill with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a life threatening condition that needs immediate specialist treatment in hospital. DKA happens when the body is unable to break down glucose because there is too little insulin, and it begins to break down fat instead. This causes a by-product called ketones to build up. DKA can lead to children falling into a coma and can even cause death.

    Diabetes UK is launching a campaign to raise awareness among parents and professionals. Barbara Young, chief executive for Diabetes UK, said: "The symptoms of type 1 diabetes are so obvious and pronounced that there is no reason why every child with the condition cannot be diagnosed straight away. "As well as making parents and those who look after and work with children aware of the symptoms, we need to increase understanding that a child who has any of the four tees needs to be tested straight away. "This is because onset can be so quick that a delay of a matter of hours can be the difference between being diagnosed at the right time and being diagnosed too late."

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-20313267

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    Quote Originally Posted by waltky View Post
    Parents overlook diabetes signs...

    Parents 'unaware of type 1 diabetes symptoms'
    13 November 2012 - Type 1 diabetes is treated with daily insulin doses
    I developed Type 2 diabetes in my late 50s and advanced quickly to daily insulin injections. It totally sucks to take a shot in the belly every day....I can NOT imagine doing that as a child diagnosed with Type 1. It's a cruel disease....but thankfully, one that you can deal with and live at least somewhat of a normal life with it.

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    waltky (11-14-2012)

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    Fortunately Type II can be managed by diet. Unfortunately, docs in America tend to prescribe the wrong diet.

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    Adelaide (12-03-2012),waltky (11-14-2012)

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    Once again glad to be in the Canadian system. Was diagnosed in June, saw an endo 2 weeks later and went through the training. No meds, just diet, fruits, veggies and fiber.

    So far, so good


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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter1469 View Post
    Fortunately Type II can be managed by diet. Unfortunately, docs in America tend to prescribe the wrong diet.
    I was pretty advanced already at diagnosis, though bloodwork only 4 months earlier had shown nothing....that's how fast it was moving on me. I was already past the "diet and exercise alone" point, but was on just one pill along with a good diet and exercise program for several months......then that quit working and it skyrocketed from there. Doc gave up and sent me to an endo....now I'm on a combo of one non-insulin injectable plus two pills, plus diet and exercise and holding my own (and off insulin, thank God). I'm always the exception to medical rules

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    Exclamation

    Diabetes epidemic 'marches on'...

    Deadly diabetes in 'unrelenting march'
    Wed, 06 Apr 2016 - The world is facing an "unrelenting march" of diabetes which now affects one in 11 people, the World Health Organization warns.
    In a major report it warned cases had nearly quadrupled to 422 million in 2014 from 108 million in 1980. High blood sugar levels are a major killer - linked to 3.7 million deaths around the world each year, it says. And officials said the numbers would continue to increase unless "drastic action" was taken. The report lumps both type 1 and type 2 diabetes together, but the surge in cases is predominantly down to type 2 - the form closely linked to poor lifestyle.


    As the world's waistlines have ballooned - with one-in-three people now overweight, so too has the number of diabetes cases. Dr Etienne Krug, the WHO official in charge of leading efforts against diabetes, told the BBC: "Diabetes is a silent disease, but it is on an unrelenting march that we need to stop. "We can stop it, we know what needs to be done, but we cannot let it evolve like it does because it has a huge impact on people's health, on families and on society."

    Failing to control levels of sugar in the blood has devastating health consequences. It triples the risk of a heart attack and leaves people 20 times more likely to have a leg amputated, as well as increasing the risk of stroke, kidney failure, blindness and complications in pregnancy. Diabetes itself is the eighth biggest killer in the world, accounting for 1.5 million deaths each year. But a further 2.2 million deaths are linked to high blood sugar levels. And 43% of the deaths were before the age of 70.

    Moving burden

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    Diabetes used to be called sugar diabetes. Type II diabetes is 100% bad lifestyle choices. It is 100% reversible until you blow it off long enough for your body to break down too much to be fixed. Then you die.
    Alea iacta est

    Check out the blog.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter1469 View Post
    Diabetes used to be called sugar diabetes. Type II diabetes is 100% bad lifestyle choices. It is 100% reversible until you blow it off long enough for your body to break down too much to be fixed. Then you die.
    That's my Dad unfortunately.

    Old school construction worker, self made millionaire, didn't believe in anything but himself.

    His eyes started going first which changed his mind on doctors quickly however it was already too late. His kidneys are toast now. Dialysis 4 days a week and has had 4 small strokes already just this year.

    Sucks so bad watching him die this way. His body is pretty much his life and it's going away fast.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doublejack View Post
    That's my Dad unfortunately.

    Old school construction worker, self made millionaire, didn't believe in anything but himself.

    His eyes started going first which changed his mind on doctors quickly however it was already too late. His kidneys are toast now. Dialysis 4 days a week and has had 4 small strokes already just this year.

    Sucks so bad watching him die this way. His body is pretty much his life and it's going away fast.
    Sorry to hear that.
    Alea iacta est

    Check out the blog.


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    Doublejack (04-06-2016)

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    Lightbulb

    Final piece of diabetes puzzle solved...

    Final piece of type 1 diabetes puzzle solved
    Sun, 24 Apr 2016 - A complete picture of what the immune system attacks to cause type 1 diabetes is revealed by scientists.
    The study, published in the journal Diabetes, discovered the fifth and final critical target at which the immune system errantly takes aim. The team at the University of Lincoln say the findings could help develop new ways to prevent and treat the disease. Diabetes UK said the findings were "impressive". In type 1 diabetes, the immune system destroys the beta cells that make insulin - the hormone needed to keep blood sugar levels under control. Studies looking at the unique antibodies made by patients with type 1 showed there were five key targets that the immune system attacked. But working out exactly what they were has been like identifying someone from their silhouette. Studies long ago discovered some of the targets, but the final one has proved elusive for two decades. Dr Michael Christie, who led the research at the University of Lincoln, told the BBC: "With this new discovery, we have now finished identifying what the immune system is targeting - we have the complete picture."


    Woman having insulin injection

    The targets are:

    Insulin
    Glutamate decarboxylase
    IA-2
    Zinc transporter-8
    And the final piece of the puzzle, tetraspanin-7

    The more technically named ones are largely involved in secreting or storing the hormone insulin. Knowledge of some of these targets is already being used in a trial at King's College London that is aiming to stall the progression of type 1. But Dr Christie says having the complete picture could help transform care for type 1 patients. He said: "Once the immune system decides it wants to get rid of something it's very hard to stop, so diabetes has proved to be a difficult disease to prevent. "So we're hoping that, by having identified the major targets in the disease, we can find ways to prevent it by blocking the immune response to these five proteins without leaving that person vulnerable to infections. "With recent improvements in our understanding of the disease I'm very hopeful we'll develop a treatment now; I have a lot more confidence than even five years ago."

    Diabetes

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