User Tag List

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 12 of 12

Thread: Diabetes advances, research & treatments

  1. #11
    Points: 22,023, Level: 36
    Level completed: 7%, Points required for next Level: 1,127
    Overall activity: 5.0%
    Achievements:
    VeteranTagger First Class25000 Experience Points
    waltky's Avatar Senior Member
    Karma
    4646
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,223
    Points
    22,023
    Level
    36
    Thanks Given
    911
    Thanked 1,123x in 899 Posts
    Mentioned
    26 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Question

    Is it really useful?...

    FDA staff question utility of Novo Nordisk combo diabetes drug
    May 20, 2016 - A preliminary review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration of Novo Nordisk A/S's experimental diabetes drug, IDegLira, questioned the interpretability of the study findings and practical use of the treatment, according to a review posted on the agency's website on Friday.
    The review comes ahead of a May 24 meeting of an FDA advisory panel that will discuss the drug and make recommendations as to whether it should be approved. The FDA is not obliged to follow the advice of its advisory panels but typically does. The drug combines Novo's drug Tresiba, known also as insulin degludec, with its GLP-1 agonist Victoza, known also as liraglutide. The company is seeking FDA approval for the combination product, IDegLira, to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes. The drug was approved in Europe in 2014 under the brand name Xultophy.

    On May 25 the advisory committee will consider a similar drug, Sanofi SA's iGlarLixi, which combines the company's experimental GLP-1 agonist lixisenatide with its insulin treatment Lantus, also known as insulin glargine. The two companies' products would be the first to combine a GLP-1 and a basal insulin in a single injection. The idea is to treat patients earlier with a combination drug rather than waiting for patients to lose control of their blood sugar on one drug before moving to another. In its review of Novo Nordisk's drug, the FDA said, "The enhanced convenience that derives from combining two products into one dosage form generally comes at the cost of loss of dosing flexibility."


    Employees stand in the insulin production plant of Danish multinational pharmaceutical company Novo Nordisk in Chartres, north-central France

    The FDA reviewers found no new safety issues with IDegLira that were not already known for degludec and liraglutide but said, "It is important to note that use of IDegLira would expose patients to safety risks associated with both products." The reviewers also said the use of IDegLira allows for lower doses of liraglutide than have been proven efficacious while incurring safety risks associated with liraglutide use. The reviewers said there were limitations with the clinical trials that make the results difficult to interpret.

    Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disorder characterized by abnormally high blood sugar levels that can lead to blindness, heart disease and other serious conditions. Lixisenatide was approved by regulators in Europe and Japan in 2013 and is sold under the brand name Lyxumia. Sanofi licensed lixisenatide from Denmark's Zealand Pharma A/S.

    https://www.yahoo.com/news/fda-staff...ce.html?ref=gs
    See also:

    FDA targets sugar in new labeling rules
    May 20, 2016) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said it would update guidelines for nutritional labels on packaged food and beverages to include information on added sugar and to prominently display calorie count and servings.
    The move comes at a time the United States is staring at increasing childhood and adult obesity and lifestyle diseases such as heart problems. The FDA said on Friday that the modified guidelines, which companies would have to adopt within two years, would help consumers "make informed decisions about the foods they eat and feed their families." (http://1.usa.gov/1ODAIin) "What and how much people eat and drink has changed since the last serving size requirements were published in 1993," the FDA said.

    Currently, companies are required to provide details on the total amount of sugar in a product. Under the modified guidelines, they will have to break down details on the amount of added sugar such as corn syrup and white and brown sugar.

    Information about "Calories from Fat" will be removed because research shows the type of fat is more important than the amount, the FDA said. According to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than a third of U.S. adults are obese. First Lady Michelle Obama, who has used her White House position to launch the "Let's Move" campaign to fight childhood obesity, had called for the changes two years ago.

    https://www.yahoo.com/news/fda-modif...or.html?ref=gs
    Last edited by waltky; 05-20-2016 at 10:15 AM.

  2. #12
    Points: 22,023, Level: 36
    Level completed: 7%, Points required for next Level: 1,127
    Overall activity: 5.0%
    Achievements:
    VeteranTagger First Class25000 Experience Points
    waltky's Avatar Senior Member
    Karma
    4646
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,223
    Points
    22,023
    Level
    36
    Thanks Given
    911
    Thanked 1,123x in 899 Posts
    Mentioned
    26 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Lightbulb

    Diabetes link to cancer in Asia...


    Study: Diabetes Linked to Cancer in Asia
    March 07, 2017 - Researchers at New York University's School of Medicine found that diabetes increased the risk of cancer death among Asians by an average of 26 percent, a statistic similar in the West.
    Data for the new study drew on an analysis of 770,000 people with Type 2 diabetes throughout East and South Asia. Diabetics were followed for an average of 13 years to see if they developed cancer and what types. During that time more than 37,300 cancer deaths were identified. Yu Chen, an epidemiology professor at the NYU School of Medicine’s Department of Population Health who was the study's lead author, says Asians with Type 2 diabetes are more likely to be diagnosed with rarer cancers than Westerners, including cancers of the liver, thyroid and kidney which was double the risk compared to non-diabetics in Asia.


    There was also a 2.7 percent increased risk of cancer of the endometrium and a 1.7 percent higher risk of breast cancer among diabetic Asians compared to those who were not diabetic. The number of cancers of the gallbladder and bile ducts in Asia were comparable to those in the West, according to Chen. Those sites are closer in the body to the pancreas, where insulin is made.



    A paramedic checks the blood sugar level of a patient at a diabetes clinic in Jakarta, Indonesia



    Chen thinks there may be several mechanisms at work, but data suggests that insulin may in some way stimulate the growth of cancer. “Patients with diabetes that have high levels of insulin, some cancers are very sensitive to insulin, so it may promote the tumor growing,” she said. The findings were published in the journal Diabetologia.


    Chen said the study was undertaken because there's been little research on an association between diabetes and cancer in Asia. She said the research suggests Type 2 diabetes should be added to the list of cancer risk factors, along with diet and cigarette smoking. “Cancer prevention needs to take into account for diabetes the lifestyles related to diabetes – [which] may reduce the risk of diabetes and also cancer,” she said. Chen suggested that diabetics should receive more cancer screenings, in addition to medical interventions to reduce the risk of diabetes overall.


    http://www.voanews.com/a/diabetes-ca...a/3754817.html

    See also:


    Researchers Develop Blood Test to Pinpoint Location of Cancer
    March 07, 2017 - Researchers are developing a blood test that can tell not only whether someone has cancer, but in what organ the tumors are lurking. The test could mean more prompt, potentially life-saving treatment for patients.
    Researchers describe their blood test as a kind of dual authentication process. It is able to detect the presence of dying tumor cells in blood as well as tissue signatures, to signal to clinicians which organ is affected by the cancer. There already are tests that screen for traces of DNA released by dying cancer cells. Such blood tests show promise in the treatment of patients to see how well anti-cancer therapies are working. But researchers at the University of California, San Diego discovered a new clue, using organ-specific DNA signatures, that leads them to the particular organ that is affected.


    The finding makes the new blood test potentially useful as a screening tool in people suspected of having cancer. UC-San Diego bioengineering professor Kun Zhang is senior author of a paper in Nature Genetics about the experimental test. "So when you try to do these kinds of early screening or early detection [tests], these people are healthy. So if you take a blood draw and then you do a test, and you find some signature of cancer, that is not enough because you do not know what to do next," Zhang said. "And so, in this case, we developed a method where we can say whether there is a cancer growing in the body and if the answer is 'Yes,' we can also say something about where does it grow."



    A patient has her blood drawn at Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania



    The test screens for a DNA signature called a CpG methylation haplotype, which is unique for each tissue in the body. When a cancer grows in an organ, it competes with healthy tissue for nutrients and space, killing off healthy cells, which release their DNA into the bloodstream. The haplotype signatures, identified by the blood test, could tell doctors what cells are being destroyed, and therefore what organ is being invaded by cancer. Zhang says knowing a tumor's location is especially crucial for early detection and treatment.


    Researchers created a database of complete CpG methylation patterns for 10 different normal tissues: the lungs, liver, intestine, colon, brain, pancreas, spleen, stomach, kidney and blood. To put together the genetic marker database, the investigators also analyzed tumor and blood samples of cancer patients. They screened the blood samples of 59 patients with lung or colorectal cancer, comparing those findings to people without cancer. "It could be potentially used as a screening test," Zhang said. "So I think that is the real potential. We need to do a few more rigorous clinical observations before we can get to that point." Zhang envisions eventually using the blood test to look for markers of cancer as part of routine blood work.


    http://www.voanews.com/a/researchers...r/3754822.html
    Last edited by waltky; 03-07-2017 at 11:51 PM.

+ Reply to Thread

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts


Critical Acclaim
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO