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Thread: The War on Drugs

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    The war on drugs is very profitable for state and the Federal governments which allows it to increase the number of people needed to enforce it. Without drug arrests for law enforcement, a slew of public and private attorney's and judges, their case load were be drastically reduced. All of those private prisons were built for drug offenders. The Afghanistan war created a path for the increase in Heroin into this country. Meth used to be made here in the US, law enforcement cleaned that up and it moved to Mexico as the main supplier of this drug to the US. The potency of Cocaine has been drastically reduced since the 80's to reduce the effects this drug has on the population. The states will all eventually have control of the weed so they make sure they get their money first.

    The message here is there is no real war on drugs because if they won it, the loss of revenue would make state governments and the entire legal system employee population decrease significantly. Our society depends on drugs being illegal and everything else associated with the black market.

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    Coast Guard makes another big cocaine bust...

    U.S. Coast Guard Unloads 10 Tons of Cocaine in Florida
    Nov. 15, 2017 - The drugs were seized during 14 separate drug smuggling busts in international waters off the coasts of Mexico and Central America.
    The U.S. Coast Guard unloaded nearly 10 tons of cocaine and 23 kilos of heroin Tuesday at Port Everglades.

    The drugs were seized during 14 separate drug smuggling busts in international waters off the coasts of Mexico and Central America, authorities said. “This offload today is not just the result of one unit, but the combined efforts of multiple Coast Guard cutters, aircraft and support, as well as that of our partners and allied men and women who continue to work day and night to stop these criminal organizations from profiting off transnational crime and smuggling,” said Commander John McTamney.


    Cocaine and heroin, seized during 14 separate drug smuggling busts, was offloaded at Port Everglades in Florida

    The estimated wholesale value of the dope was $300 million, Coast Guard officials said. “While this offload represents approximately 10 tons of illicit drugs that will never hit our streets, it also represents a significant depletion to the cash flow to these criminal organizations,” he said.

    The interdictions, including actual boarding of smugglers’ vessels, are led and conducted by the Coast Guard.

    https://www.officer.com/investigatio...ine-in-florida

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    Quote Originally Posted by waltky View Post
    Coast Guard makes another big cocaine bust...

    U.S. Coast Guard Unloads 10 Tons of Cocaine in Florida
    Nov. 15, 2017 - The drugs were seized during 14 separate drug smuggling busts in international waters off the coasts of Mexico and Central America.
    Good, that much less, on our streets.

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    waltky (11-15-2017)

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    Big El Paso drug bust...

    1,638 Pounds of Pot, 37.5 Pounds of Cocaine Seized in 21 Busts Last Week, Just at El Paso
    November 21, 2017 | - U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers working at the El Paso port of entry seized 88.6 pounds of marijuana last Thursday -- in just one car.
    That drug bust was one of 21 seizures made during the seven-day period ending at midnight on Nov. 16. In that single week in the El Paso area, officers seized a total of 1,638 pounds of marijuana in 16 drug busts -- and 37.5 pounds of cocaine in another five drug busts. The 88.6-pound marijuana seizure happened last Thursday night when a 2000 Nissan Sentra, driven by a 33-year-old Mexican citizen, entered the Ysleta international crossing from Mexico. A drug-sniffing dog alerted CBP officers to the presence of marijuana, and officers said they found 80 marijuana-filled bundles in the trunk and engine compartment.


    Drug bundles in engine compartment.

    The Mexican driver was turned over to Immigration and Customs Enforcement special agents to face charges stemming from the failed smuggling attempt. “The drug smuggling threat remains consistent, and dedicated CBP officers are focused on stopping this illicit flow while facilitating legitimate trade and travel,” said Beverly Good, CBP El Paso port director. CBP says on a typical day, it seizes 7,910 pounds of drugs at all U.S. ports of entry, based on Fiscal Year 2016 data.

    In addition to drug smuggling, CBP officers also identified numerous violations in other areas, including agriculture enforcement. CBP agriculture specialists recorded 17 violations last week in the El Paso area, resulting in penalties of $3,475 being assessed. Prohibited agricultural items seized during the seven-day period included pork, pork chorizo, pork skins, bologna, raw chicken, guavas, potatoes, apples, kiwis, oranges, avocados, hawthorns, and pomegranates. Thirteen wanted criminals were arrested at El Paso area ports last week, in addition to other enforcement actions.

    https://www.cnsnews.com/news/article...k-just-el-paso

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    Rockets Obliterate Taliban Drug Labs...

    Watch HIMARS Rockets Obliterate Taliban Drug Labs
    November 22, 2017 - First the F-22. Now HIMARS? The U.S. military is turning to some serious firepower to go after Taliban drug labs in Afghanistan.
    U.S. and Afghan forces this week attacked Taliban opium-production facilities with the M142 High Mobility Artillery Rocket System, which features a launcher mounted on an M1140 truck frame. As my colleague Oriana Pawlyk wrote in back-to-back stories here on DefenseTech, the Lockheed Martin Corp.-made F-22 Raptor on Sunday made its combat debut in Afghanistan.

    But as Pawlyk reported, the stealthy fifth-generation, twin-engine fighter developed for air-to-air superiority conducted a ground-attack mission, pummeling suspected drug labs in the country with small diameter bombs. Similarly for the counter-narcotics mission, U.S. commanders turned to HIMARS, which is also made by Lockheed and carries a six-pack launcher or one MGM-140 ATACMS missile on the bed of a medium-duty truck.


    U.S. and Afghan forces attacked Taliban opium-production labs with the M142 High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS), a launcher mounted on an M1140 truck frame

    The technology seems to be increasingly versatile — the Navy and Marine Corps just last month test-fired the system from the deck of the amphibious transport dock USS Anchorage (LPD-23) to gauge its ability to conduct precision fires at a shore target. In that exercise, the HIMARS destroyed an unidentified land-based target from a distance of 70 kilometers, or roughly 43 miles, using a Guided Multiple Launch Rocket System Unitary, or GMLRS-U.

    It’s not immediately clear whether the F-22 and HIMARS strikes suggest an evolving counternarcotics mission for the U.S. military in Afghanistan. Afghanistan is the world’s main source of opium and heroin production — and the Taliban generates an estimated $100 million to $155 million annually in illicit income from the drug trade, potentially more than a quarter of total Taliban annual revenue, according to a 2014 report by the Congressional Research Service.

    https://www.defensetech.org/2017/11/...ban-drug-labs/

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    They want precision fires for a country where heroin production is the main source of their economy. In order for our military to get cooperation from their government was for us to not stop the heroin production. The US paid some of our debt to China by giving them Afghan heroin. Our military is how so much heroin was able to be shipped to the US.
    Is this article about making the public believe that the US is now taking action to stop the flow of heroin in this country or is it about only attacking labs that are not paying the Afghan government or US military their share of the profits?

    The Afghan population had no choice but to replace their crops with heroin production in order to survive.

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    Granny says, "Dat's good - dey need to do the same in Mexico...

    US, Colombian Agents Break Up Large Drug Ring
    March 12, 2018 - U.S. and Colombian agents have broken up an international drug-trafficking ring and arrested 14 suspects for allegedly smuggling thousands of kilos of cocaine into Puerto Rico, U.S. officials say.
    The arrests over the last two weeks bring the total number of suspects detained in the long-term investigation to 30, with more than 2,000 kilos of cocaine seized.



    An official opens a package of seized cocaine in Colombia



    "We will continue maximizing our multi-agency and international efforts, and will combine resources to investigate and prosecute those who disregard our laws and smuggle drugs into our jurisdiction and increase the incidence of violent crimes in our communities," U.S. Attorney Rosa Emilia Rodriguez-Velez said Monday.


    The suspects have been indicted on charges of conspiring to smuggle cocaine from Colombia into the United States through Puerto Rico. If convicted, the defendants face 10 years to life in prison.


    https://www.voanews.com/a/us-colombi...g/4296074.html

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    Coast Guard seizes half a billion dollars of cocaine in the Pacific...

    Coast Guard Seizes 36,000 Pounds of Cocaine During Pacific Drug Patrol
    21 Mar 2018 - The U.S. Coast Guard offloaded roughly 36,000 pounds of cocaine into a California pier on Tuesday, which had been seized during a drug patrol operation in the Pacific Ocean.
    The drugs, estimated to be worth around $500 million, were taken during 17 different seizures by five Coast Guard vessels during February and March, officials stated in a news release. The drugs were offloaded on Tuesday by crew members of the USCGC Bertholf at San Diego's B Street pier, KFMB-TV reported. "This offload by the Bertholf represents the great work being conducted in the Eastern Pacific combating the transnational organized crime groups, behind the drug trade which spread instability, fear and harm to people, communities and entire nations," Rear Adm. Todd Sokalzuk, the 11th Coast Guard District commander, said.



    Pallets of seized suspected contraband sit on the deck of the Coast Guard Cutter Bertholf prior to being offloaded by Bertholf’s crew at B Street Pier, San Diego, March 20, 2018. Over 36,000 pounds of cocaine was seized in 17 interdictions by five different cutters in the Eastern Pacific between February and early March.


    Sokalzuk added that the crews aboard the Venturous, Bear, Diligence and Harriet Lane cutters, in addition to the Bertholf, assisted in the seizures of "record amounts of cocaine for the third year in a row." The Bertholf's commanding officer, Capt. John Driscoll, echoed similar sentiments, praising the crews who "worked around-the-clock." The cocaine that was seized "would have gone to fund the nefarious work of transnational criminal organizations," Driscoll said, and noted that the seizure "helps prevent a great deal of human suffering and will likely save hundreds of lives that would have been lost to these illegal drugs."


    The Coast Guard stated the drug seizure operation is part of a "Western Hemisphere Strategy" implemented in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and Caribbean, believed to be "known drug-transit zones." The Department of Homeland Security, Department of Defense and Justice Department also aided in the efforts, officials said.


    https://www.military.com/daily-news/...ug-patrol.html

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    I bet the see eye yay wasnt happy.

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    Trump goin' after the cartels...

    US, Mexico Open New Maritime Front in Drug War
    29 Mar 2018 — The U.S. and Mexico are sparring over immigration and trade, but the two countries are joining forces on the high seas.
    The U.S. and Mexican governments are sparring over immigration and trade, but the two countries are joining forces on the high seas like never before to go after drug smugglers. The United States, Mexico and Colombia will target drug smugglers off South America's Pacific coast in an operation that is scheduled to begin Sunday and last for the foreseeable future, Coast Guard officials told The Associated Press. U.S. Coast Guard Adm. Paul F. Zukunft teased the idea during a recent defense conference in San Diego, saying the United States "can't do it alone." "It's no secret we are besieged with the flow of drugs from Latin America to the United States," he said. U.S. and Mexican forces have routinely worked together at sea, but the latest effort "marks a significant step in terms of information sharing, collaboration and cooperation between the United States, Mexico and other partner nations," according to the Coast Guard. The Americans and Mexicans will exchange intelligence more freely than in the past, which could mean sharing information on well-traveled routes for drug smugglers or preferred paths for specific smuggling organizations, Coast Guard spokeswoman Alana Miller said.

    They will also board the other country's vessels to view operations and gain expertise, Miller said. In 2015, three members of the Mexican navy boarded a Coast Guard vessel during a port call in Huatulco, Mexico, but this operation calls for more frequent exchanges, and they will be at sea. The operation will last "for the foreseeable future as long as it's working for everyone," Miller said. "It's sort of open-ended." Traffickers over the years have increasingly turned to the sea to move their illegal goods, traversing an area off South America that is so big, the continental United States could be dropped inside. Smugglers routinely move cocaine out of countries like Colombia to Central America and Mexico via fishing boats, skiffs, commercial cargo ships — even homemade submarines. The operation comes after five years of record seizures by the Coast Guard. But U.S. officials say because of limited resources, the U.S. military's smallest service still catches only about 25 percent of illegal shipments in the Pacific. Even so, the Coast Guard annually seizes three times the amount of cocaine confiscated at the U.S.-Mexico border. Yet ocean smuggling has not grabbed lawmakers' attention like the flow of drugs across the nearly 2,000-mile-long (3,200-kilometer-long) land border, where the Trump administration wants to spend billions to build a continuous wall.


    In this March 2, 2017 photo, an unidentified U.S. Coast Guardsman communicates with the pilot of a helicopter during take-off and landing exercises on the U.S. Coast Guard cutter Stratton in the eastern Pacific Ocean.

    As much as 20 percent of the cocaine moving through South America ends up in the United States, and most of it lands first in Mexico from seafaring smugglers. The hope is boats will be stopped before their shipments are loaded onto Mexican trucks that fan out on various routes bound for the U.S. border, authorities said. Large boats can cart 20 tons (18 metric tons) of cocaine or more. Mexico has historically been among the Latin American countries that are most reluctant to join operations with the U.S., which can be traced back to the Mexican-American War that was fought 170 years ago. The United States cannot open military bases in Mexico, and U.S. officials, for instance, cannot venture into Mexican waters without prior permission, even if they are chasing drug vessels. The Coast Guard now stops its pursuit and alerts Mexican authorities if suspicious boats cross into their territorial waters. It's unclear whether this new cooperation will affect those restrictions. Treaties with nations such as Colombia have allowed U.S. authorities more latitude, such as permitting Coast Guard officers to board Colombian-flagged ships. U.S. officials have touted Colombia's joint anti-drug efforts as a model for the region.

    The U.S. and Mexican military relationship has strengthened since the two nations signed the 2008 Merida Initiative to work together in the drug war. There have been more cross-border trainings, especially with the Mexican Navy, which is considered less corrupt than the Mexican Army and has raised its profile with the captures and killings of drug bosses. The combined operation was planned in a series of meetings over the past year. The maritime services signed letters of intent to work together to fight organized crime while respecting each country's sovereignty and territorial waters. David Shirk, associate professor of political science at the University of San Diego, said the operation falls in line with Trump's vow to go after the "bad hombres," while President Enrique Pena Nieto has recognized organized crime is so severe that Mexico needs help. "With more walled-off sections of the border, we've seen drug trafficking organizations literally go underground or offshore," he said. Last year, the Coast Guard seized more than 455,000 pounds (206,000 kilograms) of cocaine worth more than $6 billion and brought more than 600 suspected traffickers back to the United States for prosecution. The Coast Guard has been criticized for holding suspects on ships where they cannot easily access lawyers. Shirk said joint operations could lead "to serious violations of suspects' rights at sea and possible human rights violations in the process."

    Coast Guard officials say they respect suspects' rights. Where suspects will be sent with the three countries participating in the operation will be decided on a case-by-case basis. U.S. military officials have been reluctant to openly discuss details of the cooperation with their Mexican counterparts, sensitive to the Mexican public's historical view and recent barbs between the two presidents. Jorge Chabat, a political scientist at the Center for Economic Research and Teaching in Mexico City, said he doubts the combined operation will get much negative reaction from a Mexican public tired of drug violence. "The more insecurity we have, the less nationalism we have in Mexico," he said. Ultimately, he doubts the joint operation will make much difference. "This is something they have to do to maintain drug trafficking at the same level, and not allow it to grow," he said. "That's the most you can do. You can't just surrender."

    https://www.military.com/daily-news/...-drug-war.html

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