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Thread: Childhood trauma and Genes

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    Childhood trauma and Genes

    Abused children are at high risk of anxiety and mood disorders, as traumatic experience induces lasting changes to their gene regulation. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry in Munich have now documented for the first time that genetic variants of the FKBP5 gene can influence epigenetic alterations in this gene induced by early trauma.

    The Munich-based Max Planck scientists were then able to demonstrate that the genetic FKBP5 variant does make a physiological difference to those affected, also in nerve cells. Extreme stress and the associated high concentrations of stress hormones bring about what is called an epigenetic change. A methyl group is broken off the DNA at this point, causing a marked increase in FKBP5 activity. This lasting epigenetic change is generated primarily through childhood traumatisation. Consequently, no disease-related demethylation of the FKBP5 gene was detected in participants who were traumatised in adulthood only.
    Childhood Trauma Leaves Mark on DNA of Some Victims: Gene-Environment Interaction Causes Lifelong Dysregulation of Stress Hormones

    I found this interesting - I know that trauma can significantly change the way certain areas of the brain function, (prefontal lobe, amygdala, hippocampus, so on) but it's completely fascinating that it could actually cause genes to change.

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    KC (12-03-2012)

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    So my theory of a changed and worsened national identity due to an obsessive interest and involvement with Guns , Violence and an OT version of God , has some objective support ?
    I see it as an extension of conditioning as preached by Behavioural psychologists .
    A bit like North Korea .Just a different sort of robot .

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    corrocamino (12-03-2012)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Adelaide View Post
    Childhood Trauma Leaves Mark on DNA of Some Victims: Gene-Environment Interaction Causes Lifelong Dysregulation of Stress Hormones

    I found this interesting - I know that trauma can significantly change the way certain areas of the brain function, (prefontal lobe, amygdala, hippocampus, so on) but it's completely fascinating that it could actually cause genes to change.
    And a bit worrisome. That would imply it wold take more than talk therapy to eliminate some of the problems related to childhood trauma, if it is truly the case.

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    In individuals with a genetic predisposition


    is what the study says.

    that is why some people dont seem as effected by child hood trama.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kathaariancode View Post
    And a bit worrisome. That would imply it wold take more than talk therapy to eliminate some of the problems related to childhood trauma, if it is truly the case.
    That's true - I suppose therapy would have to focus more on management techniques for stress/symptoms, (ex. positive coping mechanisms).

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