User Tag List

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 12 of 12

Thread: War with North Korea blocked by South Korea

  1. #11
    Points: 53,775, Level: 56
    Level completed: 65%, Points required for next Level: 675
    Overall activity: 18.0%
    Achievements:
    SocialYour first Group50000 Experience PointsVeteran
    IMPress Polly's Avatar Senior Member
    Karma
    152778
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Vermont, USA
    Posts
    4,514
    Points
    53,775
    Level
    56
    Thanks Given
    4,908
    Thanked 4,198x in 2,407 Posts
    Mentioned
    475 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Peter wrote:
    How would the current North Korean country unite with the South?

    Let's assume the North gives up its crazy ideology. The South would have to spend hundreds of billions, or more to rehabilitate the North. And it would take a generation or longer to un-brainwash the citizens of the North.
    There actually was an agreed-upon general framework for reunification established between the two Koreas back in 2000 for which their leaders at the time were both awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The basic idea was that Korea would be reunified as a loose confederation with both the North and the South retaining their existing governments and, to a lesser degree, their economies, but wherein the two militaries would be merged into one and the U.S. military would leave, and the DMZ would accordingly disappear and people would hence be free to travel across the peninsula as Koreans. In the first part of the 2000s, some of these things began to be implemented in stages. There was a special economic zone established between the two Koreas, for example, and train service was established that allowed people to cross the DMZ in 2002. They also participated in the 2006 Olympics under the same banner like they're doing this year. It all fell apart over the nuclear issue though when South Korea elected a conservative government in 2008. But that conservative government is no longer there and the nuclear issue does not appear to be hampering negotiations between the two Koreas anymore.

    To be frank, reunification is only possible if the nuclear issue is set aside. Just let the North have their program. As long as the two Koreas continue to behave as they presently are around that, reunification can happen. That's where I hold out hope.
    Last edited by IMPress Polly; 02-10-2018 at 07:03 PM.

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to IMPress Polly For This Useful Post:

    Peter1469 (02-10-2018)

  3. #12
    Original Ranter
    Points: 439,443, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 77.0%
    Achievements:
    SocialCreated Album picturesOverdrive50000 Experience PointsVeteran
    Awards:
    Posting Award
    Peter1469's Avatar Advisor
    Karma
    408161
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    NOVA
    Posts
    135,713
    Points
    439,443
    Level
    100
    Thanks Given
    78,377
    Thanked 59,130x in 40,660 Posts
    Mentioned
    2111 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by IMPress Polly View Post
    There actually was an agreed-upon general framework for reunification established between the two Koreas back in 2000 for which their leaders at the time were both awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The basic idea was that Korea would be reunified as a loose confederation with both the North and the South retaining their existing governments and, to a lesser degree, their economies, but wherein the two militaries would be merged into one and the U.S. military would leave, and the DMZ would accordingly disappear and people would hence be free to travel across the peninsula as Koreans. In the first part of the 2000s, some of these things began to be implemented in stages. There was a special economic zone established between the two Koreas, for example, and train service was established that allowed people to cross the DMZ in 2002. They also participated in the 2006 Olympics under the same banner like they're doing this year. It all fell apart over the nuclear issue though when South Korea elected a conservative government in 2008. But that conservative government is no longer there and the nuclear issue does not appear to be hampering negotiations between the two Koreas anymore.

    To be frank, reunification is only possible if the nuclear issue is set aside. Just let the North have their program. As long as the two Koreas continue to behave as they presently are around that, reunification can happen. That's where I hold out hope.
    Well it is interesting. I served there twice. 1989-90 and 2000-02. The first time I did two tours on the DMZ- which was awesome.
    Alea iacta est

    Check out the blog.


  4. The Following User Says Thank You to Peter1469 For This Useful Post:

    IMPress Polly (02-10-2018)

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts


Critical Acclaim
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO