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Thread: Book of Lost Books discovered in Danish Archives

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    Post Book of Lost Books discovered in Danish Archives

    Book of Lost Books Discovered in Danish Archive - The index is part of the Libro de los Epítomes, an effort by Christopher Columbus’ illegitimate son to create a searchable index of the world’s knowledge.

    Christopher Columbus may have explored oceans, but his illegitimate son, Hernando Colón, explored the mind. In the 16th century, he amassed somewhere between 15,000 and 20,000 books, part of a pie-in-the-sky effort to collect “all books, in all languages and on all subjects, that can be found both within Christendom and without.” As part of this ambitious endeavor, he commissioned an entire staff of scholars to read the books and write short summaries for a 16-volume, cross-referenced index. Called the Libro de los Epítomes, it served as a primitive sort of search engine. Now, researchers have found one of those lost volumes, a precious key to many books lost to history.

    After Colón’s death in 1539, his massive collection ultimately ended up in the Seville Cathedral, where neglect, sticky-fingered bibliophiles, and the occasional flood reduced the library to just 4,000 volumes over the centuries. Luckily, 14 of the volumes of the Libro de los Epítomes index survived, and are now held at the Biblioteca Colombina in Seville, an institution that manages the collection.

    Thousands of miles away from Seville, though, one of the lost copies survived, tucked away at the Arnamagnæan Institute at the University of Copenhagan, which houses the vast library of Icelandic scholar Árni Magnússon. Professor Guy Lazure of the University of Windsor in Canada was there when he realized the foot-thick, 2,000-page tome he was looking at may have been one of the lost volumes.
    This is the story:


    https://getpocket.com/explore/item/b...=pocket-newtab


    5f32aadee048c.jpg
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  2. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to DGUtley For This Useful Post:

    FindersKeepers (10-17-2020),jet57 (Yesterday),Lummy (10-17-2020),Peter1469 (10-17-2020)

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    Thousands of miles away from Seville, though, one of the lost copies survived, tucked away at the Arnamagnæan Institute at the University of Copenhagan, which houses the vast library of Icelandic scholar Árni Magnússon. Professor Guy Lazure of the University of Windsor in Canada was there when he realized the foot-thick, 2,000-page tome he was looking at may have been one of the lost volumes.
    Well, that certainly was an interesting detour.



    How the index came into Magnússon’s collection is unclear. According to the press release, it’s possible that it was part of a group of manuscripts brought to Denmark from Spain via Cornelius Lerche, an envoy to the Spanish court, though for now that’s just speculation.

    I think the historical back-story of the New World was very highly coveted.
    Last edited by Lummy; 10-17-2020 at 07:29 AM.
    http://thepoliticalforums.com/threads/120290-Vodafone-denies-5G-coronavirus-connection

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    I also think the New World was known back before Ptolemys of Egypt. As far as I'm concerned, who discovered what when will never be known. The reason is partly because the great libraries, like the one at Alexandria, Egypt got sacked several times, and whatever the invaders were looking for in doing so was stolen and cached away in smaller nation libraries.



    Some of that is possibly still sitting in old archives where they put it, if it hasn't been stolen by private collectors.
    http://thepoliticalforums.com/threads/120290-Vodafone-denies-5G-coronavirus-connection

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    Quote Originally Posted by DGUtley View Post
    Book of Lost Books Discovered in Danish Archive - The index is part of the Libro de los Epítomes, an effort by Christopher Columbus’ illegitimate son to create a searchable index of the world’s knowledge.

    Christopher Columbus may have explored oceans, but his illegitimate son, Hernando Colón, explored the mind. In the 16th century, he amassed somewhere between 15,000 and 20,000 books, part of a pie-in-the-sky effort to collect “all books, in all languages and on all subjects, that can be found both within Christendom and without.” As part of this ambitious endeavor, he commissioned an entire staff of scholars to read the books and write short summaries for a 16-volume, cross-referenced index. Called the Libro de los Epítomes, it served as a primitive sort of search engine. Now, researchers have found one of those lost volumes, a precious key to many books lost to history.

    After Colón’s death in 1539, his massive collection ultimately ended up in the Seville Cathedral, where neglect, sticky-fingered bibliophiles, and the occasional flood reduced the library to just 4,000 volumes over the centuries. Luckily, 14 of the volumes of the Libro de los Epítomes index survived, and are now held at the Biblioteca Colombina in Seville, an institution that manages the collection.

    Thousands of miles away from Seville, though, one of the lost copies survived, tucked away at the Arnamagnæan Institute at the University of Copenhagan, which houses the vast library of Icelandic scholar Árni Magnússon. Professor Guy Lazure of the University of Windsor in Canada was there when he realized the foot-thick, 2,000-page tome he was looking at may have been one of the lost volumes.
    This is the story:


    https://getpocket.com/explore/item/b...=pocket-newtab


    Attachment 31757
    Very interesting, thanks. He was probably motivated by the Greeks.
    Make everything from toy guns that spark, to flesh-colored Christs that glow in the dark. It’s easy to see without looking too far, that not much is really sacred.

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