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Thread: The Asian American Women Who Fought to Make Their Mark in WWII

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    Exclamation The Asian American Women Who Fought to Make Their Mark in WWII

    The Asian American Women Who Fought to Make Their Mark in WWII

    They worked as pilots, translators, guerrilla fighters and more...

    Asian American women played a critical part in America’s war effort during World War II. Coming from diverse backgrounds—including Chinese, Japanese, Korean and Filipino—they served in important roles ranging from pilots and translators to factory workers and guerrilla fighters.


    Yet they worked on behalf of a country that was far from welcoming. From the time of their arrival in the mid 19th century, people of Asian descent were denied basic citizenship and voting rights for at least a century. For Japanese American women hoping to contribute to the war effort, the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor ratcheted up barriers even further, as entire Japanese communities faced intense discrimination and incarceration in isolated prison camps. “For many, the impetus to serve came as a result of that racial discrimination—the desire to prove it wrong, and to demonstrate their commitment to the United States,” says Mika Kennedy, curator of the Japanese American historical exhibit Exiled to Motown.


    Joining the war effort through organizations like the Women’s Army Corps, the Cadet Nurse Corps and the Military Intelligence Unit also opened a new world of personal freedom and career growth for Asian American women. “This represented a huge cultural shift for many, coming from families that prior to the war had not expected their daughters to stray so far from home,” says Kennedy.

    This article highlights a few of the trailblazing women who made contributions to America’s war effort.

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    https://www.history.com/news/asian-a...=pocket-newtab


    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/asian-a...-pilot-n745851
    Any time you give a man something he doesn't earn, you cheapen him. Our kids earn what they get, and that includes respect. -- Woody Hayes​

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    RMNIXON (05-07-2021)

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    I know you don't like to make these threads political but the context of this article (i.e. the fake epidemic of hate crimes against Asians) makes me suspect a political subtext. I am not trying to diminish the contributions made by Asian individuals of either sex but Asian American women did not play a critical part in America's war effort. Why do we have do exaggerate these things? Oh, that's right. Because we're blaming Asians for Covid-19 and beating them in the streets with reckless abandon.

    That is all.
    Whoever criticizes capitalism, while approving immigration, whose working class is its first victim, had better shut up. Whoever criticizes immigration, while remaining silent about capitalism, should do the same.


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    Back in the late 90's I had an elderly Japanese neighbor (now deceased) who fought in WWII in Europe of course. I never heard a word of resentment out of him, he seemed a proud American.

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    @DGUtley I stand corrected, sir! It's Asian American Heritage Month. Yeah, it's a thing and I had no idea either.
    Whoever criticizes capitalism, while approving immigration, whose working class is its first victim, had better shut up. Whoever criticizes immigration, while remaining silent about capitalism, should do the same.


    ~Alain de Benoist


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